Tuesday, March 12, 2013

The Need for Black and Brown Dolls is Global

I received an interview request from Theodore Kermeliotis, a London-based digital producer for CNN.com.  His interview questions involved the significance of children seeing positive depictions of their own image.  At the time, Mr. Kermeliotis was putting together a story on Rooti Dolls.  

The article also discusses the lovely Queens of Africa dolls, which were featured in a post I published on July 18, 2012.

The CNN.com article on Rooti Dolls can be read here.



Thank you again, Teo, for allowing me to contribute!

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11 comments:

  1. Hello from Spain, congratulations to participate in that article. IT is very good. Keep in touch

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  2. Congratulations to you. Thanks for the info on the dolls and companies.

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  3. Thank you Marta and MDW for the congratulations.


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  4. Congratulations on participating in that interview!

    I am hoping for more dolls of color, and by that, I mean accurate dolls of color, not just the "dipped" variety.

    It is important for children of color to see positive role models and images in their own likeness, but it is ALSO important for folks of DIFFERENT ethnicities to see something positive role models and images, too.

    CONFESSION OF A RECOVERING IDIOT: I did not buy my first black doll until I was 19, because of the really STUPID perception I had, that black dolls were JUST for black people.

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    1. Thank you Miladyblue for the congrats.

      I must co-sign and say Amen! to your revelation that black dolls (just as white dolls have been for centuries) are for everyone. And not just white dolls colored brown. They should accurately and positively portray the people they represent.

      Dolls, specifically black dolls, are an excellent tool for teaching diversity, particularly to impressionable children who have not developed any preconceived opinions about people whose exterior differs from their own. Intolerance toward others is a misguided, learned behavior that usually stems from parent/guardian to child. Fortunately, this thinking can be redirected.

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  5. Hi Debbie,

    It is good to see you recognized as an international authority on the importance of black dolls. I enjoyed the article and was glad to see more entrepreneurs proactively seeking to fill a need for people all over the world. Now if only the Queens of Africa were available here in the U.S.!

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    1. Thanks, Paulette for your kind words.

      I, too, would loooooove to get my hands on all three Queens of Africa without having to pay more in shipping than the combined cost of the dolls.

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  6. Your blog has been a wonderful source of information to someone new to collecting. I just learned about Rooti dolls and would love to add a few to my collection.

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    1. Thanks, Saliyah. I hope this blog continues to be enrich your doll knowledge.

      dbg

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  7. Yay to you, Debbie for spreading the word!

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Thank you! Your comments are appreciated!