Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Two More Patients for Doc G.

Two early Ginny dolls have come unstrung.

I discovered these two limbless Ginny dolls when I retrieved my 1913 Grumpy doll to photograph for the Grumpy post.  Since their early 1990s arrival, they had been sharing a curio cabinet with Grumpy, my composition Patsy,  and several other 8-inch Ginny and Madame Alexander Wendys.  They both have 1991 copyrights from Vogue Dolls. Ginny Little Navajo is on the left and Sari on the right in the above picture.   Both are from the International Collection.

As I reached into the back of the curio to remove Grumpy, I saw the Little Navajo's jacket with the doll's arms in the sleeves, but no body or head.  Oh my... here we go again, I thought.  Sari's head, dangling from the body, was found next. 

The two patients had a bit of a wait before receiving attention.

I removed the clothing and wrist tags and kept them in the waiting area (the doll room) for a day or two before taking them to the resident doctor along with the remaining elastic cord.  Upon receiving them this past Sunday, Doc Garrett said, "I'll have to get to them later.  I'm about to watch the game."  (No one, except our grandsons, maybe, interferes with his football time.)

I have no idea how long these two had been in their states of  limb-lessness with heads loosely hanging or completely separate from their bodies; but I knew a few more days in that condition would not matter.  So I left them in the capable hands of the doctor. 


Monday evening the doctor returned the patients to me as good as new. 


I dressed them to prepare for their return to the curio cabinet.

Now that my elastic cord for restringing is almost gone, I will have to replenish the supply soon. I am certain there are other unnoticed dolls here that are in the same, if not worse, predicament.



dbg


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8 comments:

  1. You and your dolls are so fortunate to have such a capable doctor on hand! These dolls look as good as new. By the way, how's your Bob Scout doing? Has he gotten medical assistance yet? I laughed at the part about no one (with a couple of notable exceptions) interfering with the doctor's football time. I know the feeling.

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    1. Hi Roxanne,

      Bob is still in the waiting room (on top of my hutch in the doll room). I think I have been hesitant to release him to the doctor based on his plan of action. He thinks he will have to take him apart to repair the head, but I think there should be a better way. What that way is, I don't know. Perhaps a neck prong from another less important doll might work or some other way of rebuilding the neck attachment would make me comfortable enough to sign a consent for Bob's procedure. Poor Bob.

      I know not to plan anything for him that will take him away from his football or basketball, but especially football.

      dbg

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    2. Hey Roxanne,

      I opened up a paper clip to create two hooked ends. I hooked one end around a horizontal bar that is inside Bob’s body just under the neck. I squeezed and closed the ends of the hook to secure it to the bar. I straightened the other hooked end, then bent the excess wire several times and tucked it inside the body leaving enough on the end exiting the neck hole to wrap around the knob that is on the end of Bob’s head prong. More excess wire was tucked into the head. At first his head was wobbly, but I managed to push more of the excess paper clip wire into his body so that now the head and neck meet.

      It's not as stable as I'd like for it to be, but at least he is no longer headless, his body did not require opening for the repair, and most important of all, I did it myself!


      Doc dbg
      :-)

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    3. Yay, I'm glad that Bob is all better, and without an invasive procedure! :) Good work, Doc!

      Delete
  2. How much happier they look with limbs!

    I think I'm sort of impressed that Vogue did the Navajo doll with clothes of the colonialist era -- which is the convention for Navajo cloth dolls here in Arizona -- rather than going all buckskins and fringe like I usually see for dolls representing Native Americans. (The whole era's so fraught that "impressed with accuracy" and "troubled by what actually happened" kind of blur.)

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    1. And they are (happy), Smaller Places. I am too. I have one more final touch for the Little Navajo. She came with two string-beaded necklaces, the strings of which are stretched and quite weak. I have to restring those before returning them both to the curio.

      You are quite observant regarding most Native American doll attire. Of all others that I own (who wear the typical real or faux buckskin dress and moccasins), Vogue's Little Navajo stands alone in her traditional Navajo attire.

      History tends to become blurred when the actual people who lived it do not tell their own stories leading. This often leads to alteration of the truth.

      dbg

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  3. LOL, your doctor has his priorities straight! Football first then doctoring.

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    Replies
    1. Yep, pretty much... doll repair can wait.

      dbg

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