Wednesday, November 19, 2014

D is for Doll and I is for Image Intense

Volume D, World Book Encyclopedia, 1962 and 1987, respectively

"DOLL.  In almost every part of the world, children play with dolls.  They may be made of anything from cooky [sic] dough and candy to cloth and rubber.  They may be made in factories and bought in shops, or they may be made at home and cost nothing.  It makes little difference what they look like or how much money is paid for them.  Dolls are loved the world around."  (World Book Encyclopedia, 1962, Volume D, "Doll," page 234.)


Someone recently asked me if I could suggest ideas for no-sew dolls. I offered a few quick suggestions which included African Wrap Dolls and clothespin dolls.  These suggestions piqued my own interest which led to a Google.com search for "no-sew dolls."  Included in the search results was a blog on how to make acorn dolls.  The blogger recalled discovering instructions to make acorn dolls while reading the "Doll" entry in volume D of her mother's 1950s set of World Book Enclyclopedia (WBE).

Reading the blogger's experience conjured up memories of time spent using my first non-electronic search tool:  an A to Z set of encyclopedias.  As a child I could easily spend hours reading several entries in one volume, prompted by an initial desire to gain information on just one subject.  

I was compelled to grab volume D of my 1962 childhood set that I still own to read the "Doll" entry. I am sure I read the entry as a child; and as evidenced by my sister's first name scribbled on one of the pages, she had read it as well or at least looked at the pictures.  Re-reading it refreshed my memory. This was followed by reading the "Doll" entry in the same lettered volume of my children's 1987 WBE.  

I was not surprised by the scarcity of Black dolls in the 1962 entry.  A recognizable few Black dolls are included in the volume published 25 years later.  Both entries cover a variety of doll topics to include historical and modern dolls and dolls as collectibles.  A collector and her collection are featured in the 1987 entry.  Scans of both entries follow in their entirety with the exception that the collector's identity is concealed.

Doll entry scans, pages 234-244, from volume D, World Book Encyclopedia (1962)
Click/swipe images to enlarge.  Alternatively, on a computer, hold down Ctrl and + to zoom in; Ctrl and - to zoom out. 













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Doll entry scans, pages 234-243, from volume D, World Book Encyclopedia (1987)










 
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The "Doll" entry in the 1962 edition of WBE contains how-to instructions for making an acorn doll and several other doll types. See also the 8th and 9th scans above of the 1962 volume.

During recent grocery store and post office trips, where acorns are plentiful, I gathered several fallen acorns.  The plan is to make my own acorn doll or two like this blogger did, using the instructions from the "Doll" entry in volume D of my childhood WBE.  

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7 comments:

  1. Thanks for a nice trip down memory lane with the World Encyclopedia and the showing of the doll pages. I remember using the cork from the wine bottles to make dolls.

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    1. You're welcome, MDW. I am happy to have provided you with a good memory trip.

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  2. Oh, man, I totally remember that edition of the WBE. I poured over that exact volume ALL THE TIME as a kid. That volume and the 1961 Childcraft Volume 8, Creative Play and Hobbies were my favorite books. Unfortunately my WBE D got soaked and molded and I had to throw it away. I still have my Childcraft though!

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    1. I am sorry your volume D had to be discarded, Muff. I am happy I took the time to scan the pages. I tried photographing with my camera and iPad but could not get satisfactory images. The time I wasted photographing could have been saved if I had just elected to scan initially. Trying to take the easy was out wasted my time.

      I let a childhood neighbor borrow volume P of WBE that was never returned. I still regret that.

      I looked in volume 4 of Childcraft yesterday after someone asked if The Story of Little Black Sambo was in my edition. I knew it was not but double-checked to be certain. I confirmed what I already knew and also found seven one-dollar bills. You know I flipped through the other volumes, too.

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  3. This was a good memory trip for me also! My childhood set was off white with dark green on the spine, but the articles that you scanned are very familiar to me! I remember making paper dolls, sewing dolls and using pipe cleaners for their internal "articulation", and using cornsilk as doll hair.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. I didn't spellcheck the previous reply before publishing. It should have read:

      You were a very creative child to have created articulated dolls at an early age, Roxanne.

      My cousins had an updated version of WBE that was white with a green spine like the one you described.

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