Saturday, August 27, 2016

Three Specially-Priced Melody Ellison Packages through 08/29/2016


Everyone who had been waiting to order American Girl's newest BeForever modern African American doll, Melody Ellison, has probably done so by now.  For those of you who are unaware that ordering officially commenced on 08/25/2016 with three special package offerings for Melody and her accessories, this blog post is written to serve you. If you plan to purchase a substantial amount of Melody Ellison items from the American Girl website and have not already joined the AG Rewards program, do so before you purchase in order to earn 1 point for every $1 spent and receive $10 in Rewards for 200 points.  Details are provided at the website.

Please note that sale prices for these packages ends 08/29/2016 at 11:59 p.m. Central time.


Performance Package


Block Party Package
Bedroom Package
The above three items are the special packages being offered through 08/29/2016.  These and other Melody Ellison items are also sold separately.  Some of the separately sold, regularly priced items that are on my radar are shown below:


If you are just interested in purchasing the doll and book, you will receive this for $115 + shipping.



Not currently discounted is the doll, book, and accessories set which includes Melody (dressed as shown), her pill box hat, cat-eye sunglasses, handbag, "Equal Rights in '63" pin back button, and her book series:



Big spender, are you?  Then go for the gusto and purchase Melody's recording studio for $250:



How about her hair piece and accessories for only $22?



She'll be ready for the holidays and dressed so well in this Christmas Travel Set.  Each item is sold separately or bundled together as shown below, but the bundle is not discounted at this time.



Of course Melody will need her dog Bo, which is short for Bojangles.  Isn't he adorable?



There are a few more Melody Ellison items available at the American Girl website.  See all items here and have fun salivating over them as I have done.



dbg
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13 comments:

  1. Dear Lord! I always wondered how much an American Girl cost...they're so expensive!!! I love Melody's accessories and all but...wow!

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  2. I know, Julius, American Girl dolls are the Rolls Royce of 18-inch dolls. Others have tried to compete but none have as much to offer as AG dolls and accessories.

    I have never ever been an AG or other 18-inch doll enthusiast. I only own 4, two Addys (one was my daughter's, the other a preloved one that was giveaway priced), Kaya, and Cecile Ray. I am, however, very enthused over Melody and her 1960s, Detroit-native, Motown theme.

    I was 8 in 1963 and saw first hand the struggles African Americans went through to achieve equal rights. I remember watching the evening news reports of black men, women, and children being hosed with water and beaten for their peaceful protests. I remember the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama when four innocent little black girls lost their lives at the hands of racist bigots. I remember being afraid the same thing might happen to our church and being frightened to go, but kept my fear hidden and went to church with my mother, sister, and brothers anyway.

    Melody represents the 8 to 10-year-old me and other girls I knew in 1963; I dressed like her; I wore my hair like her; I loved listening to music and watching all the Motown artists perform; I must own her. She is part of American history that I witnessed and survived. I don't need all the extra paraphernalia, however. Even if I had the room for it, I wouldn't want it. But Melody... she will be coming.

    dbg

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    1. I had an original response to your post that was written on the fly and was somewhat flippant in comparison to my actual thoughts...I cannot understand the times specifically having been born a generation later and in a different part of the world. I do have immense feelings and respect for the period of Civil Rights and being someone who was excited by Motown on discovering an old cassette of The Supremes greatest hits in my mum's record collection understand the power of that sound! I can only try to imagine what it was to grow up young and black through that time in history. Melody is an awesome entry in the AG catalogue and one I am so glad resonates so deeply because it is a period that has lessons to teach especially in 2016. As for price...it's nothing when you love something. All my best wishes always, Julius.

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    2. Hi Julius,

      Your original response, which you deleted, came through to my email. I appreciate your sentiments regarding the What Happened, Miss Simone? Netflix documentary (which I watched some time ago). She was a troubled yet quite remarkable woman. I am so glad you found one of your mother's old Motown cassettes and were able to experience the Motown sound.

      I realize those who did not live during the turbulent times of the pre-Civil Rights and Civil Rights Movement cannot begin to understand how it impacted the lives of those who did live through it. They were, for the most part, however, happy times for me because I was insulated in a community of many people who loved me. Segregation actually wasn't a constantly terrible experience for me when I realize I had everything I needed within my community without having to leave it, even though I was a child who didn't require much more than love. There is only one incident that I recall involving racial indifference that involved me first hand, which I won't go into detail about here. Had I been an adult during the 1960s, things certainly would have been different with the lack of means to possibly further my education, obtain equal employment and equal pay, fair housing, and a host of other restrictions that were placed upon people based on skin color. The fact that a person was restricted or a people were restricted in such a manner, while everyone else was allowed to be free, was not at all acceptable and that is why the Civil Rights Movement was so important and this is why today the Black Lives Matter movement is even more important.

      Things have improved tremendously here in America since 1963, but we still have a long way to go where everyone is given the equal amount of respect, regard, and freedoms they deserve as human beings, where everyone's life matters, because if it did, there would be no need for a movement such as Black Lives Matter.

      Anyway, on a positive note, my reply to your original reply was only meant to explain why the era that Melody represents is important to me and why I will purchase the doll and her accessories. I never had the same connection to Addy (a doll that represents a recently escaped slave) that I do to Melody. Of course, we know slavery existed and many slaves were able to escape to freedom, but my beef (until now) with American Girl is that slavery is not representative of all aspects of African American history. Some 22 years after Addy was introduced, they seem to understand this by introducing Melody who, I hope will remain a significant part of the BeForever Collection much longer than Cécile Ray (whose background was of 1850s New Orleans affluence, but the poor doll was retired after only about three years, 2011 through 2014).

      As always, Julius, I enjoy reading your comments. Please ignore me when and if what I have written makes me appear "all up in my feelings."

      dbg

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    3. Hi Debbie, you never need to not be up in your feelings. I just wanted to clarify my thoughts a little better. The reason I enjoy this blog so much is I get an opportunity to learn a lot about social history through something we both love as dolls and toys generally are so reflective of the times they exist in.
      The AG line does seem a little restrictive in its reflection of people with colour so let's hope Melody lasts a long time, she does seem timely and a strong reminder of the things gained and that there is some distance to go in the journey for equality for all people. And as an aside if you haven't yet seen the Nina Simone documentary it's well worth catching it's a fascinating look at an incredibly talented if troubled lady. :)

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    4. I need to read slower...yes you've seen the film. I watched it again last night, so powerful. Liz Garbus has also done 'Love, Marilyn' which is an amazing look at Marilyn Monroe and on most recently on Gloria Vanderbilt made in partnership with her son Anderson Cooper...some interesting releases if you have the time.

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    5. I enjoy watching documentaries about people and those that focus on real life issues. I will make it a point to check out the two you've suggested. Thanks, Julius!

      dbg

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  3. Melody is just as precious and she can be and representing my hometown is even better. Like you I don't need the accessories, although everything is just as adorable.

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    1. Everything is adorable! She is representing your hometown so well, Brini!

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  4. That's SO AWESOME that you and Melody are almost exactly the same age! I was hoping you'd be getting her. :-)

    I'm snuggling my own Melody as I surf the net looking for 1960s clothing inspirations to expand her wardrobe, but one detail is eluding me... did black people wear satin sleep caps at the time? Central heating was still a few years away from exploding in popularity, so wearing some kind of head covering to bed was obviously a MUST during winter (especially in Detroit). Research is fun, but Google is failing me!

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    1. Hi Corinn,

      Yes, if Melody were an adult, we'd be about the same age, Corinn. Pretty cool! Silk bonnets were not available in 1963. Colorful silk starves were a staple. Then there were preformed triangular-shaped head scarves that women wore, the front of which had about three rows of foam inserted. My mother wore those over her rolled hair and sometimes over her combed hair. I will find links and share and/or share a photo of my mother wearing one.

      dbg

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    2. Hi Corinn,

      During the 1960s, women wore headscarves like these and these, tied behind their necks, as shown.

      Little girls usually wore sheer organza headscarves and sometimes silk printed headscarves tied under their necks like this.

      dbg

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  5. I wasn't a big fan of American Girl dolls even after seeing them on Oprah and having goddaughters who were crazy about them but I think they've hit it out of the ballpark with Melody. Not only does she represent an important time for people to learn about always, but especially now with civil rights movements having to get active again but, her accessories are the most interesting I've ever seen for a doll. I can't believe she even has a fall. That's so sixties. :D
    Like you I hope she stays around for a long time and judging by all that's available for her and the costs involved, I suspect Mattel is thinking if it that way too.
    Thank you, I really enjoyed this post and the comments.

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Thank you! Your comments are appreciated!