Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Black-Doll Cover Girls Here and There

Seeing Black dolls on the cover of major doll publications remains a rare occurrence.  This lack of representation on the cover as well as inside these publications is why I discontinued my subscriptions to all, with the exception of one.  I receive quarterly issues of United Federation of Doll Club's Doll News because I am a member of that organization through my Motor City Doll Club associate membership.

On a positive note, UFDC's Fall 2012 Doll News began what I hope will be a trend toward correcting Black cover-doll underexposure.  That issue is discussed here. In addition to the fashion doll that graces the cover of that issue, four articles on Black dolls and a Black paper doll are included within.  Now that was history that has not yet been repeated.  Perhaps others will eventually catch the wave.

February is Black History Month.  Haute Dolls magazine features a Black doll on the cover of their February 2014 issue.  Will we see more of this throughout the year?  I certainly hope so!

I now own dolls and/or fashions that have been featured on doll magazine covers in the recent past.

Wilde Imagination's All-Natural Lizette Spice has two wigs, as shown above.  She arrived wearing a simple tan dress and tan strappy high-heel shoes (the straight wig, original dress, and shoes are now stored in her wardrobe).

While my newly acquired All-Natural Lizette Dionne (shown above) is not the doll featured on the May 2013 issue of Haute Doll, another Lizette Dionne by Wilde Imagination is the cover doll for that issue.  The cover doll wears the Just Peachy fashion that my All-Natural Lizette now wears below:


Although it cannot be determined from her pensive expression, Lizette enjoys seeing herself as the cover girl of the magazine that she touches ever so gently to make sure this is not an illusion.
The Limited Edition Cynthia Bailey Collectors Doll by One World Doll Project (OWDP), designed by Stacey McBride-Irby is featured on the January 2014 cover of Dolls magazine.  I fell in love with my doll and wrestled with the desire to debox her or not.  To resolve this dilemma, I purchased a second doll during a sale at AngelicDreamz.   The second doll's certificate of authenticity is number 161, so I deboxed the first doll, whose certificate is numbered 250.  I had already opened the first doll's box.  Therefore, the second doll will remain sealed within her box and her shipper.  A photo of my deboxed doll along with the magazine on which she is the cover girl (that I had to purchase individually since my subscription has lapsed) is shown below:


Cynthia Bailey Limited Edition Collectors Doll by the One World Doll Project, designed by Stacey McBride-Irby, is featured on the cover of the January 2014 issue of Dolls magazine.  Inside this issue,  OWDP co-founder, Trent T. Daniel discusses his goals for the company and the Prettie Girls line.

So while improvement has been made regarding the use of  Black dolls on the cover of major doll publications, equal representation has not yet been achieved. Magazine editors/publishers and others should realize by now that Black dolls are as relevant and as desired as others.  I personally would like to see more feature articles on Black dolls with Black dolls on the cover as well as at least one article on black dolls included in every issue of every doll publication, not just in February.  Until that day arrives, my lapsed subscriptions to doll publications will remain as such, and I will continue to write the Black Doll Collecting Blog, where vintage-to-modern Black dolls are always the main focus.   

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6 comments:

  1. It's fantastic that they are featuring a Black doll but you right about the inequality and focus on ethnic dolls. Heck, the same goes for ethnic PEOPLE in human magazines. While a "by us, for us" effort usually has to be maintained, it would be nice if there was better representation. However, FUBU always seems to lead to other groups expressing reverse bigotry when you focus efforts on minorities. Way way back when BET was formed, I don't know how many times a white person said to me, there's no White Entertainment Television, why should there be a Black Entertainment Television? That's racist!" My response was often, "Of course there's a White Entertainment Television. It's called ABC, CBS and NBC!" Times have changed and networks are somewhat diverse, but still.

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    1. But still is right, Muff. We definitely need a new normal in all media outlets, magazines, TV, movies, because the current normal is not inclusive of all. Everyone likes to see themselves and the things they like in the books and magazines they read... at least I do.

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  2. It is great to see the black dolls on the cover.

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    1. I agree, MDW. It is nice to see modern black dolls as cover girls. My desire is to see more.

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  3. Those are the best models hands down. I never had any subscriptions to the doll magazine because I never saw many black ones so there was on reason to purchase any. There have been many improvement but not enough.

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    1. It is better, Brini, but it's still an imbalanced scale.

      I was a long-time subscriber to many major doll magazines: Dolls, DollReader (now Dolls), Contemporary Doll Collector (now Doll Collector), Doll Castle News, Barbie Bazaar, and others. I remained hopeful with each issue that articles on black dolls would be included. Some were but they were few and far between.

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