Thursday, July 28, 2022

QueBan a 1/6 MJD BJD

Jesui is an 11-inch vinyl unstrung BJD by QueBan


I purchased Jesui after a doll-friend posted photos of two different QueBan dolls. There are five different dolls shown in the Amazon buy links below.



Jesui has a caramel brown complexion, black rooted hair, blue stationary eyes, and multiple points of articulation. She wears a neon yellow (described as green in the Amazon description) top and pants, and white high-top Chucks-style sneakers.

The details on the back of the box are shown in the next image.

Back-of-the-box details

Described as a 1/6 MJD BJD Cool Girl the height on the box is listed as 9 inches. My doll measures 11 inches from head to toe.

She came with an extra pair of hands.


Inside the box, Jesui was inside a plastic liner shaped to fit her body. Her extra pair of hands and white "Chucks" were packaged separately.

The index fingers on the extra pair of hands are curled under.

I have not tried the extra pair of hands on Jesui, but I did remove one of her existing hands to check the ease or difficulty of removing it. I pulled on the hand gently until it popped off.


She is a very cute doll with unique facial features.

Close-up of Jesui's face

All of the dolls have blue eyes. Hopefully, the company will include brown-eyed dolls in future releases. 

Redressing

I wanted to see if I had clothes on hand that fit Jesui. Before she arrived, I thought Sparkle Girlz fashions might fit, but they do not. Her body is larger than Sparkle Girlz’. My next thought was that Uncanaan 1/6 BJD clothes would fit. Some clothes made for 30 cm BJDs might fit depending on the style. Because  Ucanaan dolls are a full inch taller than QueBan dolls, clothes made for them will not fit perfectly. 

Jesui posed with a Ucanaan BJD to illustrate the height difference and for a complexion comparison. She has a light caramel complexion.

In this photo, Jesui wears a Uncanaan fashion. The sleeves of the blouse cover her hands, otherwise, the fit is okay.

In this photo, the sleeves are tucked under to give the illusion of a perfect fit.

I moved on to other clothes that did fit Jesui. I was surprised that some Curvy Barbie fashions fit well.

This is Zig and Zag Barbie Fashionista #57's dress. The shoes were made for 1/3 BJD dolls.

This is Barbie Fashionista #144's animal-print top and shorts worn with her own sneakers. #ad
While redressing, to prevent the hair from tangling, I banded her ponytails.
 
This is Barbie Fashionista #125's romper (the Fashionista with purple hair).

The next fashions were made for a variety of different dolls as described in the photo captions.

Made for 13- to 13-1/2-inch Sibahle (Paola Reina) dolls, this romper fits if the collar is pulled down more than required to do for the taller dolls.

This Boneka dress fits well. It is Monday’s Child Daria’s original dress. Daria, by Dianna Effner, is 10 inches tall, an inch shorter than Jesui.

This yellow dress and the raincoat in the next photo were made for 10-inch Georgia/Ann Estelle from Effanbee/Tonner’s Mary Engelbreit doll line from several years ago.

The raincoat fits loosely because Jesui is thinner than Georgia and Ann Estelle.

This nautical fashion was made for 1/6 BJDs. It fits well.


The pink Ucanaan skirt, top, stockings, and pink shoes are what Jesui continues to wear for now. I hope the company will add clothing for 1/6 MSD BJD QueBan dolls soon.




©Black Doll Collecting/dbg

There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.

__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

If you're not already a subscriber, visit, "like" and follow the Black Doll Collecting Facebook page or bookmark the Black Doll Collecting home page and visit on Tuesdays and Thursdays when typically new posts are published.

Check out what I am selling here
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*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
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Saturday, July 23, 2022

New Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black Post an Interview With Myla Perkins

Myla Perkins, author of Black Dolls an Identification and Value Guide 1820-1991 and Black Dolls an Identification and Value Guide Book II #ad

I had the great pleasure and honor of interviewing Black-doll enthusiast, doll historian, and author, Myla Perkins. The three-part, in-depth interview is published on my Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black blog. Part 1 begins here. Enjoy!

©Black Doll Collecting/dbg

There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.

__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

If you're not already a subscriber, visit, "like" and follow the Black Doll Collecting Facebook page or bookmark the Black Doll Collecting home page and visit on Tuesdays and Thursdays when typically new posts are published.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!

Thursday, July 21, 2022

Glitter Girls Keltie's Redress

Glitter Girls Keltie wears the "What a Surprise" fashion.


First seen here, Glitter Girls Keltie received a new fashion for "my" birthday. I recently took the time to redress her in it and took the above photo. 

Her eyes are not lavender or purple as they appear in this photo.

I am so pleased that the glitter in this fashion is more permanent and doesn't go everywhere like the glitter in her original fashion. I placed the original fashion, shoes, and accessories in a plastic bag after she arrived in November 2021. 

Keltie has enjoyed other redresses as illustrated in my first blog post about her, but I really like the "What a Surprise" fashion shown in the #ad below.



It includes a birthday hat, a party dress, socks, shoes, and a gift box. This fashion and others were recently discounted on Amazon. 

One of the Glitter Girls dolls was also reduced to $8.16 for Amazon Prime Day. View all the Glitter Girls dolls at this #ad link


©Black Doll Collecting/dbg

There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.

__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

If you're not already a subscriber, visit, "like" and follow the Black Doll Collecting Facebook page or bookmark the Black Doll Collecting home page and visit on Tuesdays and Thursdays when typically new posts are published.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!



Tuesday, July 19, 2022

Robyn from Barbie Life in the City

Robyn is a character in the Barbie Life in the City series.


Ebony-complexioned Robyn comes with a café kiosk with shelves and accessories. 


Robyn has a non-articulated petite body, brown painted eyes, rooted brown natural textured hair with auburn highlights, and paint-on black baby hair. She wears a pink fruit-print top with a pink skirt, and turquoise slip-on sandals.

The café kiosk

The playset includes a kiosk with shelving, a reversible "open" and "closed" sign, a cash register screen, and a service counter. A cup of coffee, a pretzel, a muffin, and a croissant are also included. Robyn also has a leashed puppy.
This photo of the top of the kiosk illustrates most of the café accessories and the puppy.

This is a closer look at the counter and cash register screen.


The kiosk, Robyn, and the puppy are illustrated on the back of the box.

Other Barbie Life in the City characters are also illustrated.

Two Brooklyn Barbie Life in the City playsets are featured on the back panel of the box.

Robyn poses with Brooklyn Barbie

A close-up headshot of Robyn and Brooklyn Barbie

Before she arrived, based on the prototype photos, I thought Robyn shared the same head sculpt as Brooklyn Barbie, but their sculpts are different. Robyn's head is marked ©2021 MATTEL. So she is relatively new. I am not sure if Mattel has used this sculpt before, but her face looks familiar. The toothy grin is a bit bothersome, but I can live with it until I decide to give her a closed mouth with acrylic paint. 

In the final picture, Robyn sits with Barbie Looks Model #10 for a complexion comparison.

Their complexions appear to be about the same.

 I pierced Robyn's ears with quilting needles, which are used as stud earrings. 


©Black Doll Collecting/dbg

There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.

__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

If you're not already a subscriber, visit, "like" and follow the Black Doll Collecting Facebook page or bookmark the Black Doll Collecting home page and visit on Tuesdays and Thursdays when typically new posts are published.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!

Friday, July 15, 2022

Bertabel and Janci

Annie Davis Frierson is a 16-inch porcelain or clay-baked doll hand sculpted by I. Roberta Bell in 1975.


A doll by I. Roberta Bell of Bertabel's Dolls made in the likeness of the artist's grandmother is a recent acquisition. I was fascinated by the doll's story that is written on the hang tag . 

Annie Davis Frierson, who was born in 1859, died in 1939. The hang tag  reads:

About seven when slavery was over, she had no last name and knew nothing of her parents. She was adopted, reared, and schooled by a family named Davis, graduating from what later became "Fisk University" in Nashville, Tennessee. She married a school mate, the Rev. Robert Frierson, bore twelve children, one of which was the mother of I. Roberta Bell, and taught in a rural school in Tennessee.

Outside hang tag  text

The inside of the hang tag reads:
Bertabel's Dolls by I. Roberta Bell 
Artist member 
National Institute 
of American Doll Artists

Full-length view of Bertabel's portrait doll of Annie Davis Frierson

When I saw this and several other dolls by the artist on eBay, I named and claimed this one as mine. Another listing by this artist was in my sights, too. After being outbid on that one, which ended a few minutes before the Annie Davis Frierson auction, I set serious sights on Annie and I bid to win!


Nila is a 14-inch wood and cloth doll by Janci Dolls

A 14-inch wood and cloth doll named Nila, made by Janci Dolls in 1995 was offered in the same week as the Bertabel doll. I've wanted a Black Janci doll for at least two decades. When I saw this one on eBay a few days before the listing ended, I named and claimed it as mine, too.

She has such a sweet face.

Nila has a precious face, more precious than the other Black Janci dolls I have seen that others own. A 24 x 11-inch poster of an ad that was featured in a 1996 issue of Contemporary Doll Collector magazine accompanied Nila.

Both dolls have been installed in DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum. View their installations at the links below:




©Black Doll Collecting/dbg

There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.

__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

If you're not already a subscriber, visit, "like" and follow the Black Doll Collecting Facebook page or bookmark the Black Doll Collecting home page and visit on Tuesdays and Thursdays when typically new posts are published.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!



Tuesday, July 5, 2022

When I Saw Her Standing There

A group of exhibited dolls from the collection of Marjorie Loring Gauley

An online doll friend solicited my help in finding a museum or another organization to donate her Black-doll collection. She shared a link to photos of some of the dolls when they were displayed in a past exhibit.

In one of the pictures (shown above), I saw a doll that interested me. I asked for more information about it. At that time, the dolls were packed and stored. She promised to share the information later.

At one point, before making the decision to donate the collection, I attempted to help her sell some of the dolls. After the decision to donate, I shared the names of a couple of individuals who are involved in organizations that work with children. One of her goals was for the dolls to be enjoyed by children. The main goal was to keep the small collection together.

After communicating with one of the two people I recommended, Marjorie Loring Gauley chose to donate the dolls to Karen Oyekanmi's American Black Beauty Dolls Association.

After this decision was made, Marjie asked for my mailing address. She wanted to send me the doll that I saw standing on the far right in the first picture of this post. This pleased me beyond measure. I gave her my PO Box address.

A couple of weeks later, in an email, Marjie explained that while attempting to ship the doll through a UPS Store, she could not use my PO Box address. My physical address was required, which she didn't have and had no way of getting from me at the time she needed it. In her words, this is what happened next:

I checked to see if I had a phone number for you so that I might obtain an alternate address. In contacts a phone number showed in pale print with your other information saying that Siri thinks this number might be yours. I called it and Karen’s name popped up as she is in my contacts so I cut the call right away.

But in this day and age, she of course, saw the call and called me right back. I explained that the call had been an accident and explained the situation and she provided me with your contact information... Karen and I ended by agreeing with her observation that the call was God running interference to smooth the way, no accident after all. I hope you concur.

I replied and agreed that this was indeed divine intervention. As confirmation of the divine intervention that occurred, had I not shared Karen as a possible recipient of Marjie's collection, or had Marjie chosen the other person I suggested—who does not have my physical address or any of my contact information, in fact, I don't think she knows me—the shipping issue would have been prolonged.) Yes, God was certainly in the mix from start to finish.

A doll with such a sweet face will forever remind me of how God's grace reveals itself through the kind acts of others.

The lovely doll that I had no information about arrived safely. I opened the box, and before removing her, hoping she was not porcelain, I blindly touched her face and discovered that she is painted cloth. Cindi Ciampa made this beautiful doll.

With the doll, Marjie included a beautiful Annie Lee Shades of Color note card titled "Sunday Evening Radio." The front of the card and her handwritten inscription are shared next.

The Annie Lee note card, "Sunday Evening Radio" features a pre-television era family seated in their living room or parlor listening to the radio.

Marjie wrote a touching inscription.


The additional information that I have gathered about the doll and the artist is included in the doll's installation in DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum. Read it here.

Thank you, again, Marjie for your kind and generous gift of Grace, which is the name I have given her. I am honored and feel truly blessed to be Grace's new owner.


©Black Doll Collecting/dbg

There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.

__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

If you're not already a subscriber, visit, "like" and follow the Black Doll Collecting Facebook page or bookmark the Black Doll Collecting home page and visit on Tuesdays and Thursdays when typically new posts are published.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!