Wednesday, February 20, 2019

TOY FAIR 2019: Mattel - ALL NEW Toy Story 4 | DC Super Hero Girls | Poll...



Froggy and Little Froggy showcase Toy Story 4 toys and dolls, new DC Super Hero Girls, and Polly Pocket dolls.



dbg
There is always something to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.

__________


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TOY FAIR 2019: ALL NEW Disney Descendants | Disney Princesses | Hasbro



In this Toy Fair 2019 video, Froggy and Little Froggy share new dolls from Disney.

dbg
There is always something to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.

__________


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Tuesday, February 19, 2019

#SnapStar Dawn

#SnapStar Dawn

There are some new articulated 9-1/2-inch all-vinyl dolls by Yulu on the scene called #SnapStar available at Walmart.  My doll's name is Dawn.   She has the deepest complexion of the six dolls, five of which are featured at the top of their Instagram page.

The six #SnapStar dolls are illustrated on the side of Dawn's box.

They are Dawn, Echo, Aspen, Lola, Yuki, and Izzy.  Izzy has a medium tan complexion.

Dawn is illustrated on a side panel of her box.
There are separately sold fashions for the #SnapStar dolls.
While at Walmart, I purchased three of the six separately-sold fashions.  Two that I left are made of shimmery fabric that I do not care for.  The other is a cute white dress with white  Roman sandals that I should have purchased.



Dawn has brown stationary eyes and a brown, removable wig.  She wears a white satin blouse which is attached to black satin shorts.  She also wears a black satin jacket and black high-heel booties.  Black vinyl drop earrings and the black vinyl handbag she carries complete her look.  A cellphone, foldable green screen wall, and a green doll stand are also included.

Dawn's star-shaped green doll stand


The concept is to snap (photograph), style (using makeup and styling features of the app which is available in the App Store or Google Play) and share on Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, and other social media outlets.

Each doll has a theme and a brief bio.  Dawn's bio reads:

Fashion Diva! Dawn is a high-powered, high-fashion diva who only settles for the best – she knows what she wants and always gets it! Want to know where the party is? Call Dawn!
Dawn took her first photo outside the box using the green screen wall as the background.

Articulation illustration
In addition to the usual five points of articulation, the area underneath the mature bosom is articulated along with the elbows, wrists, knees, and ankles. 

Dawn wears a 9-inch Bratz fashion and petite Barbie shoes.
I was unable to remove Dawn's black booties until I dipped her shoed feet into boiled water to loosen up the vinyl of the boots.  This might be a flaw that is isolated to my doll only, but quite possibly is not.

As illustrated in the photo immediately above, she can wear 9-inch Bratz clothes, but not the shoes because she has a full foot which is arched.  In the above photo, she wears a pair of flat shoes made for petite Barbie.

#SnapStar and LIV Comparison
Head sculpt comparison between LIV Alexis and Yulu's Dawn; Dawn's nose is a little broader than Alexis' nose.  Her chin is slightly narrower than Alexis'.

#SnapStar dolls look very similar to Spinmaster's LIV dolls.  Dawn is shorter and has a broader nose.  Like LIV, they even have painted hair underneath their removable wigs as illustrated next.

Dawn's black painted hair looks similar to LIV Alexis's painted hair.
Dawn's wig has a vinyl plug in the center.

Like LIV dolls, there is a hole in the center of Dawn's head where the wig plug attaches to the head.

They can wear each other's wig.

The fiber quality of Dawn's wig is inferior to that of  LIV wigs.  The poor quality of the wig and the shoe issue are the only two cons.  The shoe issue is more bothersome than the less than desirable wig quality.

dbg

There is always something to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Sunday, February 17, 2019

2019 NY Toy Fair


New York Toy Fair is being held at the Jacob K. Javits Center from February 16-19, 2019.  Below is a link to one video and two embedded videos of some of the new dolls and toys that are being introduced.

In the Reuters video here, Mattel gave a preview of some of the new Barbies that are being presented at  New York Toy Fair.

See what's new from Mattel and Fisher-Price in the next video by TTPM.  The Barbie segment begins at 2:03 minutes.  



My Froggy Stuff provides a video dedicated to the new Barbie line below.

The Barbie Fashionista with wheelchair assortment (includes a ramp) will be available as a white doll and a black doll as illustrated in the two previous videos.   This one and most of the other fashionistas will not be available until the fall of 2019.  She black doll here.

If other videos surface that include dolls, I'll publish a follow-up post.

dbg
There is always something to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Friday, February 15, 2019

Black History with Dolls by Joyce Finley-Stamps Part 1


Long-time doll group and Facebook friend Joyce Finley-Stamps who, in addition to being a doll collector, is an appraiser, lecturer and also genealogist.  Joyce has shared daily Black Doll History photo facts on Facebook.  With her permission, the first several days of her shares are included in this post.  These are not necessarily in the order in which Joyce shared them.

Click or tap the images for better viewing.

This is a porcelain President Barack Obama doll by Mary Washington.  Barack Obama was the 44th President of the United States.

Framed information about President Barack Obama Doll by Mary Washington













Joyce's remaining Black History with Dolls will be shared at the end of this month.  Thank you again Joyce for allowing me to share these here and for your dedication to preserving black-doll history.

dbg
There is always something to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Thursday, February 14, 2019

Happy Valentine's Day!


Now that the inconvenience is over, blogging will resume here, for now.  Thank you again to those who read about the situation in my two previous blog posts and for the encouraging words and sentiments you expressed.

Little Red Dress Barbie

💕I'd like to wish each of you who celebrate it, a Happy Valentine's Day!💕


😘Love,

dbg
There is always something to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019

So It's Great Work Now


The review of the citation this blog received from Google for containing allegedly dangerous or derogatory content is copied below. The specific name of the program policy is blotted out.  

Dear Publisher, 
This Google Publisher Policy Report gives you an overview of recent activity related to violations found on specific pages of your websites. As enforcement statuses may change over time, please refer to the "Page-level enforcements" section of the xxxxx Policy Center for the current list of active violations.  
(The Policy Center in blue text above was a clickable link, which took me to a page that showed the following screen-captured information.)  



The email continued, with attention to the bold text:

Please note this report doesn’t cover violations that may happen on an overall site or account level. You may be notified by a separate email if site or account level violations are found. Ads will continue to serve where no policy violations have been found, either at the page- or site-level. 
In the last 24 hours: 
  • 1 page was reviewed at your request and no policy violations were found on the page at the time of the review. Ad serving will be restored on this page and your monthly review limit will be credited.

Further details on enforcements can be found in the xxxxx Help Center. To learn more about our program policies, please view the xxxxx Program Policies.  

Kind regards,
Google Publisher Policy

The above form email was sent from a "no-reply" email address.  So I could not contact Google xxxxx to request an explanation for this insult.  All the anguish this caused me was for nothing except to disable ad serving (paying for clicks on page ads).  This incident was an egregious error on their part which they failed to admit and offer an appropriate apology, which means it could happen again.  

I went to the xxxxx Help area and sent the following query:
Re:  https://blackdollcollecting.blogspot.com/
After receiving an erroneous policy violation notification for "dangerous or derogatory" content, without fixing anything (because there was nothing to fix), I requested a review.  The result of the review was that my page was not in violation.  

I'd like to know how these violations are determined.  Are pages reported by individuals?  Is an algorithm used to detect keywords that might be deemed inappropriate?  Randomly suspending ads on pages that are not in violation and providing a review that finds no violations of any policy is an insult to the publisher and a waste of time to all parties involved.  This procedure needs to be revised to include diverse humans who can make valid decisions as to what is in violation and what is not.

Wouldn't it be more considerate to provide the publisher with specific text or images that are in violation instead of the vague details that a page is in violation that needs to be "fixed" and automatically suspend ads before a review can be requested?

The Reply:
I notice you have written two blog posts about this on your site. Writing about xxxxxx is not a good idea. It draws attention to your ads, and could result in invalid clicks which could harm your account. I'd remove them if I were you.

Violations can be detected by bots (looking for stop words or scanning images). Or they might be the result of a human review following a report. In your case it seems like a bot detection. The bots aren't intelligent enough to know the true context.

It wouldn't be cost-effective for all bot detections to be reviewed by humans as well, as most of the time the bots get it right.

Your review request was successful.

My opinion is, the system is working as designed, even though it was inconvenient.
--------
My Reply to the Reply: Thank you for the explanation.  I agree; it is very inconvenient when there is no there there.  
--------
(The name of the specific program is blotted out in the previous post as well.  My opinion is the bot system failed miserably in this case.)  


dbg
There is always something to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Blogging While Black-Doll Collecting


The recent occurrence of white people calling the police on black people for basically attempting to enjoy life has led to monikers, memes, and social media shaming for these 911 callers.  A few of  the monikers are described below:

  1. Barbecue Becky:  Called police on African American people for barbecuing in an Oakland, California park.
  2. Golf Cart Gail:  Called police on a father for cheering on his son at a soccer game (the claim was that he yelled at the referee).  Insert a pair of rolling eyes here.
  3. Permit Patty:  Called police on a young African American girl for selling water on a hot summer day in San Francisco.
  4. I am not sure if this one was memed or monikered, but social media shaming ensued for the woman who called the police on an African American man who was attempting to enter his own apartment. 
The memes and monikers might be funny to some but the act of calling the police on black people in America for doing trivial, nonharmful things, or for just going about their daily routine of living is no laughing matter.  Ask the countless loved ones who still grieve the loss of their unarmed family members who lost their lives at the hands of police.

The title of this blog results from an email I received from Google claiming that a page of my blog is in violation of one of their policies and therefore this [particular feature] has been suspended from the page in question until I "fix" it.  The URL they provided of the page in question is the home page of my blog, where in my opinion, there is nothing to "fix"!  But maybe they feel the entire blog is in violation.

They described the violation as follows:

Dangerous or derogatory content
As stated in our Program policies, Google ads may not be placed on pages or apps that contain content that:
  • Threatens or advocates for harm on oneself or others;
  • Harasses, intimidates or bullies an individual or group of individuals;
  • Incites hatred against, promotes discrimination of, or disparages an individual or group on the basis of their race or ethnic origin, religion, disability, age, nationality, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, or other characteristic that is associated with systemic discrimination or marginalization.
Home Page Image by Son of Ellis
In light of the most recent Gucci sweater blackface insult, could the little boy doll above with the wide smile and red lips be considered offensive?  He obviously wasn't offensive in the 1940s when his image and similar black dolls' images were printed on fabric and sold for consumers to cut and sew.  I am sure that nine out of ten of the people who cut and sewed this character were not black.
For the past several years, my home page has contained the above graphic art headshot image of me surrounded by a selection of vintage-to-modern black dolls from my collection.  Yes, these are actual dolls that I own.  The title on the home page, "Black Doll Collecting" has never changed.  The last three published blogs, the first of which was Simple Justice at the time the violation notification was received, are also always visible on the home page.  The sidebar feature is visible to those who view the blog on nonmobile devices.  It contains my notice of copyright, a search feature, a translation feature, tracking for recent blog visitors, links to previous blogs, links to a featured blog post, popular blog posts, and other doll-related links.

I immediately thought the offensive matter was my coverage of the movie, Simple Justice, which is a detailed account of Justice Thurgood Marshall's Brown v the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas defeat. This case ruled that school desegregation was unconstitutional.  I felt coverage of the documentary was blogworthy because dolls were used to prove that segregation made black children feel inferior to white children.  The post was all about the dolls.  My posts are always all about the dolls that I love that just happen to be black like me.  If this is deemed offensive, I need to find a new blog host because I will not be censored.

This has made me feel like a victim of blogging while black-doll collecting.  Just like the unjustified 911 calls on innocent people should end, this sort of nonsensical reporting and restriction should, too.  Twice before, specific posts on this blog were cited for nudity or sexual content because the posts included photos of undressed dolls.  The dolls were nude only to better illustrate their articulation.  Whoever reported the posts probably did not read the content before the report was made.  Had they done so they would have understood the reason the dolls were unclothed.  Google cited the pages for containing sexual content.  I requested reviews for both those posts.  Those reviews ended in my favor.  So why was a warning issued at all?

I requested a review of this most recent citation and now await their decision on whether or not they continue to feel my blog or a specific page of it is dangerous, derogatory, or any of the other reasons outlined in the bullets above.

Here's hoping that the review of whatever has been deemed inappropriate this time results in my favor.  If not, I'll explore other blog hosting sites.  Please stay tuned.

__________

2/13/2019 10:44 a.m. CST  The results of the requested review of this violation citation can be read here.

dbg
There is always something to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Thursday, February 7, 2019

Simple Justice 1993

Dolls Test Dolls from American Experience Simple Justice

On January 18, 1993, episode 8, series 5 of PBS's American Experience was titled Simple Justice.  The documentary starred Peter Francis James as Thurgood Marshall during his 1930s Howard University law school attendance and law practice that followed.  The late James Avery played the role of Charles Hamilton Houston, who was Howard University's Dean of Law at the time Marshall attended.  The documentary is based on the book, Simple Justice: The History of Brown v. Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Equality.  The book was written by Richard Kluger, first published in 1975.

After graduating Howard Law School in 1933, Marshall along with Houston and other lawyers began challenging the 1896-established "separate but equal" ruling in higher education because facilities and institutions of learning designated for blacks were separate but never equal to those available to whites.  Their work led to overturning the Plessy v. Ferguson case* and the 1954 Supreme Court decision to desegregate schools in the United States.  By 1971, all schools in the US were desegregated.  (It took almost 20 years, however!)

In Simple Justice, Giancarlo Esposito plays the role of Psychologist Kenneth Clark whose Dolls Test was used in the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas.  Clark's test concluded that segregation caused black children to feel racially inferior to whites.

In Simple Justice Dr. Clark's Dolls Test used four dolls that cost him 50 cents at a Harlem Five and Dime store.  Because African American boys and girls were the subjects of the test, two of the dolls used were dressed as males (one black and one white) and two were dressed as females (one black and one white).  Except for gender and race, the dolls were the same brand.  In the original 1940s test, four dolls dressed only in diapers were used, two white dolls with yellow hair and two black dolls with brown hair.

Still shot from American Experience Simple Justice of Dr. Clark's character, Giancarlo Esposito, conducting the Dolls Test

Dr. Clark's role in the film begins at the 50-minute timestamp and leads to the reenactment of the actual Dolls Test.   You may skip to the second video to view the 55-minute 10-second location where the Dolls Test begins, but the argument to support the need for the test is worth viewing.

The argument to support the need for social science (the use of the Dolls Test) to prove segregated schools were damaging to Black children begins in the following video.  Press the Play arrow to begin and the Pause button after the argument concludes at 52 minutes and 16 seconds.



The Dolls Test -- Press the play arrow to begin and the pause button after the Dolls Test segment.  A link to the full documentary is at the bottom of this post.


*"Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537 (1896), was a landmark decision of the U.S. Supreme Court issued in 1896. It upheld the constitutionality of racial segregation laws for public facilities as long as the segregated facilities were equal in quality – a doctrine that came to be known as 'separate but equal'." [Wikipedia]

Library of Congress photo of Dr. Kenneth Clark [reenacting] the Dolls Test with a young male child.  This photo was taken by Gordon Parks, published in the July 1947 issue of Ebony magazine wherein the child is referred to as "Peter."

As Simple Justice also reenactsBrown v. Board of education proved that separate but equal schools were damaging to the psyche of black children and was ruled unconstitutional in 1954.  Dolls were used to prove this.

While the documentary does not give credit to Dr. Clark's wife, Mamie Phipps, Clark, "It was an extension of her Master’s thesis on racial identification of Negro students. That was the thing that came to be known as the 'Dolls Test' that the Supreme Court cited. The record should show that was Mamie’s primary project that I crashed. I sort of piggybacked on it." (K. B. Clark, as cited in Documenting history: An interview with Kenneth Bancroft Clark. History of Psychology, 13, p. 76 by L. Nyman, 2010.)

Related Links:
  • The full documentary, American Experience Simple Justice can be viewed here.
  • Learn more about Brown v. Board of Education Topeka, Kansas here.
  • Dr. Clark's eulogy, which mentions the dolls used in the Dolls Test, their cost, and where they were purchased, can be read here.
  • Read a PDF of the original Dolls Test here.
  • Profile Mamie Phipps Clark
  • Marked 1968 identical black and white dolls by Effanbee were donated to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) by the Clark's daughter, Kate Clark-Harris.  (Based on the 1968 date, these are not the original dolls used by the Clarks but are possibly one of the last, if not the last pair used in one of their later doll studies.)
  • See the 1968 Effanbee dolls as they appear on exhibit in the NMAAHC here and here.  The museum label for the dolls reads:  Segregation and Child’s Play
    Tests performed by psychologists Kenneth and Mamie Clark using these and other dolls helped convince the justices that segregation had negative psychological effects on black children.  Gift of Kate Clark-Harris in memory of her parents Kenneth and Mamie Clark in cooperation with the Northside Center for Child Development


dbg
There is always something to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Check out what I am selling here
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Monday, February 4, 2019

14R-Marked High-Heel Fashion Doll

1960s 14R Miss Revlon-Type Fashion Doll

After sharing a link to my blog post "2018 Dolls Given and Received," which includes information about an 18-inch circa 1960s high-heel fashion doll, the President of Motor City Doll Club informed me about a similar doll she wanted to sell. 

We worked out the transaction and the doll arrived shortly thereafter.

Dressed as a bride, the doll arrived in better-than-expected condition.

If memory serves me correctly, the previous owner indicated the doll's fashion was originally worn by another doll.  The dress and cloche-type hat, which might have formerly been the top of a bridal veil, fit her perfectly.

Her white vinyl high-heel shoes fit perfectly, too.  


I ironed the ribbons on her bouquet to refreshen.  Otherwise, she is perfect.

Her black rooted hair is shown from the back in this photo.
This circa 1960s 14R doll has black rooted hair which is still silky and maintains the original curl.  

She has brown sleep eyes with all eyelashes intact, and a one-piece stuffed vinyl body.  She is actually a twin to the doll shown here that now lives with my friend Debra R.  This doll wears her original drop pearl earrings.  

The white satin dress has a netting overlay that does not extend to the back.  The dress buttons in the back as illustrated in this full-view photo.


She is a welcome addition to my collection, which currently includes three other Miss Revlon-type dolls that can be seen at the end of this post.

See my Pinterest board of other 14R and other '50s to '60s Black high-heel fashion dolls here.

dbg
There is always something to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for following, commenting, and sharing using the share button below.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!

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