Friday, September 27, 2019

Creatable World Doll Review with Video Link

The Creatable World box 
Amazon shipped my Creatable World doll as shown, without a shipping box.  I had to gingerly peel off the address label from the front of the box cover, part of which covered the leg of the image of the doll.

Part of the tracking number remains on the back of the box cover as shown on the left in the yellow area.

An additional sticker with the tracking number and a larger one had to be removed from the back of the box cover.  I was able to remove the smaller sticker successfully, but the larger one was not able to be removed completely as shown in the above picture.  Glue residue remains on the front and back of the box cover where the stickers had been.

At checkout, the above option was available.  I did not choose "Ship in Amazon packaging" because I had no idea that by not doing so meant no packaging at all would be used. This is issue #1 with this doll; they did not use a shipping box!

The doll is packaged by Mattel in a beautifully designed box with a cover that slides off.  The two circular pieces of tape that were supposed to hold the cover to the inner box were folded over the edges of the inner box.  This leads me to believe I received a returned doll or that someone opened the box prior to my receipt of it.  This is issue #2.

Included inside the box is a poster with eight different ways the doll can be styled.
This photo was taken after the cellophane cover was removed from the inner box.  The doll and the accessories were neatly placed inside.  Nothing was strapped down.

At this point, I am still disappointed by the way Amazon shipped the doll, but I like what I see well enough to keep the doll.

She (that is my doll's gender identification) is able to sit nicely.  She is unable, however, to cross one leg over the other at the knee.

She is 11 inches tall and articulated in the usual five places as well as at the elbows, wrists, knees, and ankles.  The waist is not articulated.  The joints were a little stiff at first, but with gentle manipulation, I was able to move them with ease.  She struck this pose before I noticed something else.
The doll has a paint rub on one side of her head.  At first, I thought maybe it's supposed to be like this, but why, when the other side is not?  This is issue #3.
Since she was here, I decided to proceed with trying on the wig and a couple of the fashions before arranging a return to Amazon.

The braids are attached to a rigid vinyl wig cap.  With the wig on her head, sitting on top of the rooted patch of top hair, it looks exactly like she's wearing a hair cap.  I would have preferred a more flexible wig cap.  Had the braids extended to the front edge of the wig cap without leaving the rim visible, a more natural hairline would have been achieved.
The blue tutu is worn with the white undershirt she arrived wearing.  Silver cowboy boots and a cloth handbag were added to this look.
Going for even more of a Western look, she added a Stetson-style hat.
Next, she donned the red and white jacket that has faux leather sleeves with a pair of denim shorts and red high-top sneakers.  (Incidentally, all of this Creatable World doll's clothes have Velcro closures; nothing snaps or buttons.)
Her lightly tinted sunglasses were tried on, which is when I noticed issue #4.  Some of the black paint is flaking off the rim of the sunglasses.  I had already decided to send the doll back and this confirmed that I should.

I tried a few more pieces on her and she took more pictures before I returned her to the box and informed Amazon of these issues.  The additional and final photos are shown below:

The wig was tried on again.  This time some of her own hair served as bangs.

Unfazed  by her flaws, she posed again in this photo and the next.

I really like the doll and the concept of multiple fashions and a wig.  Had she been issue free, she would be allowed to stay, but back she must go.

For a full review of Creatable World Dolls, view the My Froggy Stuff paid ad below.






If you choose to order this doll from Amazon and wish to receive it in a shipping box, be sure to choose Amazon packaging.


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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Creatable World Dolls by Mattel

Stock photo of Creatable World doll with braids


Mattel has created a doll line, Creatable World, that allows children to explore doll play with nongender-specific dolls, clothing, and accessories.  According to the description, a child can create 100+ different looks with one character.  Some of the clothing features real snaps and pockets.

The dolls are 11 inches tall with extra articulation at the elbows, wrists, knees, and ankles.

Currently available on Amazon (see link below), there are several different dolls with different complexions priced at $29.99 each. 

Is it a boy, is it a girl, or is it whatever the child (or adult collector) wants it to be?

Creatable World at Amazon

Do you think this line will be a hit or a miss?  (I've already ordered and will write a follow-up review after the doll with the braided wig arrives).


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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Monday, September 23, 2019

Philip Heath's Welcome to the World African American Baby Boy

Philip Heath's Welcome to the World dolls, ca 2001 were presented in a trifold blue gift box complete with ribbon and Gotz gift tags.
Released in 2001, Philip Heath's Welcome to the World porcelain doll series, manufactured by Gotz,  included African American and Caucasian anatomically-correct girl and boy infants positioned in a modified fetal position.

I included my doll in my second book, Black Dolls a Comprehensive Guide to Celebrating, Collecting, and Experiencing the Passion in chapter 5, which is devoted to artist dolls.  A scan of that entry with the 2008 assessed value is shown next.

Heath's African American Baby Boy Welcome to the World doll is seen in this scan from Black Dolls a Comprehensive Guide to Celebrating, Collecting, and Experiencing the Passion, chapter 5, page 262

As indicated in the description in the book, the baby measures 4 inches (10.16cm) from head to toe.  He is unjointed and rests inside a white faux fur-lined gift box, attached to the lining with a metal waistband.  In today's market, the doll would be valued much more than $75.  Additional photographs from different angles are included next.




He is anatomically correct as indicated, with his anatomic parts blotted out in this photo.

My doll's box contained two Gotz gift tags, the inside of both reads in German as follows:

German:
Fur _____, dem süßesten Baby der Welt.  Wir haben uns schon so lange auf Dich gefreut.  Seit _____ bist Du nun endlich bei uns.

Zur Erinnenerung an


English Translation:
For _____, the sweetest baby in the world. We have been looking forward to you for so long. Since _____ you are finally here with us.


To the remembrance

These babies would make a perfect gift to celebrate a newborn infant's arrival to the world, but this one was a gift from me to me the year they were released. 


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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Friday, September 20, 2019

9-inch Composition Topsy

9-inch composition Topsy, a gift from Leslie Foster

Because she was literally flaking away, I lightly sanded, painted, and sealed the exterior surface to extend Topsy's life.  She is shown above in a before picture.

First seen in a previous post with other doll gifts from Leslie Foster, this circa 1920s, spring-jointed composition Topsy was in need of tender loving care.  I was determined to provide the necessary care before she entered the doll population.

What Was Done
The first coat of "Nutmeg" acrylic paint has been applied to Topsy's face, to the front of her torso, arms, and legs.  She remained supine until the paint dried.
In this photo, Topsy's back and the backs of her arms and legs have been painted.  She remained prone until the paint dried.

Here is a close-up of the partially painted face before the eyes and mouth were repainted.  Some residue of the original paint or repainting that someone before me did is still around one of her eyes.

Topsy's hair, eyes, eyebrows, mouth, face, torso, and extremities have been fully painted.

Here is a close-up of Topsy's repainted face to include the eyes, eyebrows, and mouth.  Matte varnish has already been applied to the head (some of it is on the forehead in this picture).
Before varnish was applied, she insisted on taking this photo from the back.
A couple of coats of matte varnish have been applied to Topsy from head-to-toe.  To prevent her arm sockets from flaking where pieces of the composition are missing, I glued thin strips of brown felt inside the arm socket and/or onto the arm joint.
Final touches!
Finally, I made a felt romper for Topsy which is sewn on at the shoulders and tied on with a peach ribbon at the waist.  I replaced the deteriorating white hair ribbons with orange grosgrain ribbons to match her rust-colored romper.   I need to add buttons or appliqués to the bodice and will do so later.

Ready to survive another 100 years, Topsy is "in where she fits in" seated in a doll baby bed with similar dolls.

Read more about composition dolls here.

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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
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Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Doll Gifts Part 3

A gift of dolls from Leslie Foster includes a Topsy Turvy doll, three souvenir dolls, two Black Americana dolls, a composition doll, and an oilcloth mask-face doll.

This is part 3 of a 3-part doll-gifts series to acknowledge dolls that I have received recently from doll friends and people who do not know me personally.

These eight dolls were a gift from Leslie Foster, who happened to find me through this blog.  These were purchased, she indicated, over several years because she found them interesting.  I also find them interesting.

Each doll has been photographed individually and its description recorded in my doll inventory workbook.  They are as follows:


Topsy Turvy, also known as Two-Sided and Double-Sided Doll
Circa 1940s Topsy Turvy, black side up

I was pleasantly surprised to discover that this 11-inch circa 1940s doll is a Topsy Turvy.  The black doll has a machine-painted face that is made of black cloth.  She is dressed in a red and white polka dot dress and wears a red headscarf tied in a top knot.  She is missing one of her gold-tone earrings.

Topsy Turvy, white side up


The white doll has a lithographed/screen printed face and yellow yarn for hair that is underneath a blue and white gingham sewn-on bonnet.  Dress color and fabric match the bonnet.  Both dolls' eyes side-glance to their left.


Spice Lady Caribbean Souvenir Doll
Spice Lady Caribbean Souvenir Doll
Still enclosed in a sealed plastic bag, this circa 1960s 7-inch cloth doll has a spice-filled skirt.  A faint scent of the mixed spices is still apparent.  The face is drawn with black ink.  She wears a red bonnet that is tied on with a piece of rust-colored yarn at the neck.  A tag stapled to the end of her scarf reads, "Sunny Caribbe" with "Spice Lady" written below that.


Black Americana Cotton Picker
Black Americana Cotton Picker

Circa 1930s-1940s 9-inch doll has black cloth head with lithographed eyes, nose, and mouth.


He has salt-and-pepper hair.
Black and white yarn create the "cotton picker's" salt and pepper colored hair. His arms are made of wire with black felt used for his hands.  His body, legs, and feet are black wood.  He wears a striped cotton shirt with blue cotton bibbed pants, no shoulder straps. Clothes are stapled on.  

There is real cotton is in his burlap bag.
The Cotton Picker carries a burlap cotton-filled bag.


Trinidad and Tobago Lady Souvenir Doll
Trinidad and Tobago Cloth Lady Souvenir Doll
This circa 1940s 11-inch cloth doll made from heavy canvas-type brown fabric has painted eyes and mouth and a sculpted nose.  

There are creases in her lovely face and some of her lip color has faded.  I want to remove the creases, but I am not sure how.

She has short hair made from black yarn.  Silver beads are sewn to her ears for earrings.  Different cotton printed fabrics were used for her headscarf, shawl, and dress.  A yellowed slip shows underneath the dress.  Trinidad and Tobago is stamped over St. Thomas near the bottom of the slip.  Apparently, this doll or the fabric used for the doll's skirt was also used for St. Thomas souvenir dolls. 


This Trinidad and Tobago Souvenir Lady carries a basket on her right arm that has red, orange, and blue pieces of felt glued to the outside.   Heavy cardstock creates soles which are glued to the bottom of her brown cloth feet (not shown).


Black Americana Boy

Circa 1940s-1950s cloth boy
This 16-inch circa 1940s-1950s Black Americana cloth boy made from black fabric has handpainted side-glancing eyes, a red-painted nose, and a circle-shaped mouth.

He has half-moon-shaped sclerae and seems to be surprised about something.

He has copper-colored yarn hair underneath a red felt cap.  His overalls were made from mattress ticking.  There is a floral fabric patch on the right knee of his overalls that can be seen in his first photo above.


Composition Topsy
Topsy

Circa 1920s 9-inch unmarked composition Topsy has three yarn braids with yellowed ribbons on the ends.  


Topsy has painted side-glancing eyes (the paint has faded).  She is spring jointed and wears a pinned-on white jersey-knit diaper.  The top layer of the composition has flaked off in several areas and continues to flake.  I plan to apply a sealant to prevent additional flaking.  The right arm will not remain inside the socket.  I will try to remedy this as well. 

Jamaica Souvenir Doll

Jamaica souvenir doll

This 9-inch circa 1940s Jamaica souvenir cloth doll has a basket of faux fruit attached to her head.  The fruit is made from balls of colored tissue paper.  

A closer look at the fruit basket

She has a hand-painted face.  The head, arms, legs, and body are made from black cloth.  Multiprint fabrics create the headscarf, dress, and apron.  "Jamaica" is written on the waist of the dress.  This doll is similar to two others that were given to me in 2015 by another woman named Lesley (different spelling, however).  The other two are a couple of inches taller than this one.  This doll is also made similar to one of the dolls given to me by Ms. Grace Anderson.  All three similar dolls can be seen here.


Oilcloth Mask-Face Doll
Circa 1930s Oilcloth Mask-Face Doll
The final doll from Leslie is a 12-inch circa 1930s oilcloth mask face doll with painted facial features.  

She has a charming face.
The eyes glance to the doll's right.  Mohair bangs are underneath a light pink headscarf which is tied in a knot at the top of the doll's head.  Underneath the pink scarf is a red, white, and blue striped scarf made from the same material as the skirt of the doll's dress.  The doll's arms are made from blue fabric that has multicolored diamond shapes.  She wears a white blouse with a red, white, and blue striped skirt, and red felt sewn-on shoes.  She is now my second oilcloth mask-face doll, the other one having been purchased many years ago.

________

Thank you again, Leslie, for your generous gift of dolls.  I had actually forgotten how many dolls you were sending.  My mind was focused on receiving only four dolls from you.  After I opened the package and continued unwrapping the well-packed dolls beyond four, I realized I had received a double blessing!

Related Links
Doll Gifts Part 1
Doll Gifts Part 2
Topsy Turvy dolls (recently updated)

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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for following, commenting, and sharing using the share button below.

Check out what I am selling here
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Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
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