Monday, October 21, 2019

Shop for boy dolls, baby dolls, rag dolls, black dolls, biracial dolls – Best Dolls For Kids

Shop for boy dolls, baby dolls, rag dolls, black dolls, biracial dolls – Best Dolls For Kids

In response to my post on Where to Buy Black Dolls, I received a message from the Pattycake Doll Company regarding their mobile- and tablet-user-friendly site devoted to dolls for children.  I have revised my previous post Where to Buy Black Dolls to include the link to their new site and have also included a few other sites of interest.  Happy Shopping!


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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.

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Friday, October 18, 2019

Heidi Ott Miniature Dolls x2


This miniature doll by Heidi Ott arrived in a cotton-lined gift box.

After Heidi Ott left the full-scale doll world several years ago, she began making miniature dolls and accessories (dollhouse scale).  For years, I had wanted to add at least one Heidi Ott miniature doll to my collection.  Within the past month, I have acquired two.

Kia Arrived First

Kia by Heidi Ott

Representing a teen, Kia is a 4-inch resin doll with a cloth body.  She wears a green dress that has a multicolored (green/orange/yellow) crisscross fabric overlay.  A matching bead-accented headwrap covers her black yarn hair.  She wears a beaded necklace.

The headwrap has gold-tone hoops attached.  Kia has brown painted eyes.    


A beaded bracelet adorns her left wrist.
The bead-embellished straps of her sandals are made of the same fabric that was used for the dress. 
 
A doll stand was included.
Miniature Crawling Baby

Crawling miniature baby by Heidi Ott is made of resin with a stuffed knit body.

The 2-1/2-inch crawling baby arrived nude as shown above.  The baby has painted brown hair and eyes.  On the same day of purchase, a pink crocheted outfit made for Heidi Ott miniature dolls was found.  The baby is shown in the final two photos wearing her crocheted clothes.



The outfit includes a bonnet, dress, and booties.  I need to shorten the ribbon ends of her bonnet, but I am glad the seller left the ribbons long enough to be tied in a bow.  The patience required to crochet something to fit a doll so small amazes me.  I am even more amazed by Heidi Ott's ability to sculpt these dolls with such detailed precision.


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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Monday, October 14, 2019

Where to Buy Black Dolls


This post includes a list of companies and websites in alphabetical order that sell black dolls and other dolls of color suitable for children.  These companies either sell black dolls exclusively or they have an inclusive doll line (with at least one doll of color included in their current lines).  The dolls will vary in price.  Trinity Dolls Inc. carries dolls made for adult collectors but will soon have dolls made for children.  Bookmark their website.  Names followed by an asterisk (*) are not US-based companies/sellers  Names followed by two asterisks (**) sell handmade dolls that are suitable for children.  The initials NH denote dolls with natural hair (all or some are sold at the site).


A Girls*  (NH)

Adora Dolls 

Adora Dolls Amazing Girls Sienna (an Amazon exclusive)  (NH)

Afrikashyne  (NH)

American Girl (Addy, Create Your Own Doll, Gabriela, Melody, Truly Me; 18- and 5-inch-mini-dolls)


Barbie (some w/NH)

Beautiful Blessings (12-inch full-figured fashion dolls with a touch of elegance)


Creations by Ba'ucham (hand-crocheted dolls)**


Fresh Dolls and Positively Perfect (NH, 12-inch fashion dolls, baby and toddler dolls)



Hearts for Hearts (multicultural dolls, NH)

Herstory Doll* (NH)

I am U Dolls (by Stacey McBride-Irby)

Ikuzi Dolls* (NH)

Journey Girls on Amazon

Kenya and Friends (some w/NH; see 2nd comment for retailers)

Lottie Dolls (Kid Activist Lottie has NH.)

Madame Alexander  (very limited dolls of color offerings)


Melanites (Jaylen, Action Pal)

Msimbi* (NH)

My Life As (a Walmart-exclusive 18-inch doll line, also some mini dolls, some w/NH)

My Salon Doll (Dolls with stylable human hair)

Our Generation Dolls (Target-exclusive 18-inch dolls and accessories)

Pattycake Doll Company (a variety of multicultural dolls for everyone, NH); for mobile and tablet users, visit Patty Cake Doll Company's new site.  





Trinity Designs, Inc. (higher end, collectible sorority-inspired dolls, some w/NH)

Urbidolls* (NH)


Search Results for "African American Doll" at Amazon, Target, and Walmart:

Target

Target also has a Just Like Me link where you can search for dolls with specific characteristics, e.g. skin tones, eye color, hair color, hair texture, etc.  I tried one skin tone category, but a variety of skin tones resulted.  Maybe this is still a work in progress.

Walmart  

(Earn cashback with qualifying purchases from the above three retailers and many others by joining Rakuten and navigating from Rakuten to their websites before your purchase is made.)

You can also search Etsy for "African American" or "Black" doll; read descriptions carefully as some dolls may not be suitable for children.
**********

If you know the names of other companies that sell new black and brown dolls suitable for children, please add those names in a comment and I will revise this post with those names.


Disclaimer:  This list was compiled as a courtesy for those who have had difficulty finding black and brown dolls.  Please note that while I own dolls by many of these companies and/or know others who do, I am not affiliated with any of the companies or brands listed.  



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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Friday, October 11, 2019

Sherry's Unintended Collection of Black Dolls

Photo captured from My Auction Finds

Please read the rest of the very informative My Auction Finds article here.

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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
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Thursday, October 10, 2019

1950s Rubber Doll with Bun and Others

This circa 1950s rubber doll's ID is unknown.  

This 10-inch rubber doll is marked with an "A" on the lower mid-back.  There are two unclear letters on the head before the numbers 44 and 12.  Illegible letters followed by "1" are underneath her right foot, and TP-10 is underneath the left foot.  The doll's manufacturer is unknown.

The "A" mark on her back is right above the waistline of her molded-on panties.

This full-length photo of the back shows her molded bun.

She has a jointed neck and a one-piece stuffed rubber body, arms, and legs.  Her hair is molded in a bun-with-bangs style that was popular for girls during the 1950s.


A view of the bun from the side

Her face is adorable!

She has the sweetest face with side-glancing black painted eyes.  Her closed mouth is painted red.  With the exception of her molded-on panties, socks, and shoes, she was probably sold nude to be dressed by her original 1950s little mama.


The new girl is photographed with other rubber dolls with molded hair.  The doll on the left was made in the 1950s by Allied Eastern and bears their "AE" mark.   Her bun and the new girl's bun are almost identical.  The AE doll, however, is made of vinyl.  The doll on the right is also unmarked.  She has a ponytail.  She arrived with missing eyes.  I painted the sclerae white and glued a tiny black quilting pin into each eye socket for pupils.


These three show off their molded buns and ponytail in this photo.


The new girl poses with Sun Rubber Company's Tod-L-Tot.

The newest girl might have been styled after Sun Rubber's 1950s Tod-L-Tot, the doll shown with her above.  Both dolls have molded-on undies, socks, and shoes.  Tod-L-Tot's body is not stuffed.


Other 1950s Rubber Dolls


In this final photograph, Tod-L-Tot and So-Wee (a baby doll by the Sun Rubber Company), are photographed with a doll that was probably fashioned after So-Wee as their face sculpts are quite similar as is their molded curly hairstyle.  The redressed red-suspender-skirt-wearing baby has a darker complexion than So-Wee, a one-piece body, and a jointed neck whereas So-wee has five points of articulation.  Her manufacturer is also unknown. If memory serves me correctly, the doll in the red skirt was purchased from a Canadian seller where the doll might have been made.

I enjoy adding these dolls to my collection because they were made in the decade in which I was born.  Had these brown-skinned versions been readily available in my area, I might have owned them as a child.


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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

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Friday, October 4, 2019

Diahann Carroll and Julia Dolls

One of my Julia dolls side glances at an image of a doll that looks like her in the October 1969 issue of Ebony magazine.

I have had plans for years to write a blog post about Mattel's Julia dolls that represent the role Diahann Carrol played from 1968 to 1971 in the prime time sit-com, JuliaJulia was the first American TV show that featured an African American in a nonstereotypical leading role.  Time had not presented itself for me to write the post until now when I felt compelled to take the time to do so.

The Julia show first aired on September 17, 1968.  I was 13 and enjoyed watching the weekly shows from the first to the last, which aired on March 23, 1971.  Julia Baker was a widowed nurse and mother of a young son, whose name was Corey Baker (played by Marc Copage).  The back story was that her husband died serving in the Vietnam war.  Julia was a nurse in a doctor's office.


The lovely Ms. Carroll poses with the first two versions of the Julia doll, Talking Julia on the left and nurse Julia, a Twist 'n' Turn doll on the right.  The Julia doll, which is not a true portrait of Ms. Carroll, uses the original Christie head sculpt.  This photo is also from the October 1969 issue of Ebony magazine.

Because of the popularity of the show, Mattel debuted two Julia dolls in 1969.  One doll represents Ms. Carroll as Nurse Julia Baker.  The other, Talking Julia, is dressed in evening wear.  Ms. Carroll introduced the dolls in the October 1969 issue of Ebony magazine in the article, "Diahann Carroll Presents the Julia Dolls."  I purchased a copy of the magazine several years ago after my initial plan to write an in-depth article on the Julia dolls and extra boxed fashions.  As indicated above, that never happened.  Photos, scans, and/or snips from the 1969 Ebony article follow:


The above text is the actual article from the October 1969 issue of Ebony.  The rest of the article consists of images and captions as illustrated next.






Twist 'n' Turn Julia is held by little Miss Annette Johnson.
Seen with several Julia doll heads are Ms. Jean Berger (left) and Ms. Mellie Phillips (right).




This is a slightly larger photo of Ms. Phillips, now deceased, whom I believe was African American.


Several Julia dolls in nurse uniforms and other glamorous fashions are seen here with Ms. Charlotte Johnson (former fashion designer director at Mattel) and Ms. LaRue Diniakos.
Ms. Johnson and Carol Spencer (noted former Mattel designer) are seen in this photo with additional Julia dolls.  The magazine caption for these photos (minus the larger photo of Ms. Phillips) is captured below.

The Ebony article ends with this image of original Twist 'N' Turn Julia.

~~~~~~~~~~
Some of Julia's extra fashions are shown here, L-R Ruffles 'N Swirls, Leather-Weather, Burr-Furr, Pink Fantasy, and Candelight Capers.  These photos were scanned from the booklet that came with my Live-Action Christie.

Julia dolls from my collection are shown next.
Julia 1970-1971, second issue, wears a one-piece nurse uniform and hat.  The doll's hair color was originally dark brown/black; it has now oxidized to red.

Talking Julia was made from 1969-1971.  Her original brown hair has oxidized as well.  She is mute.  One of the phrases the doll spoke was, "Hi, my name is Julia!"

The 50th Anniversary Julia doll wears a replica of the original two-piece nurse uniform.  This doll was released in 2009.
The text on the back of the reproduction doll's box reads:  Julia debuted in September of 1968, changing television history forever!  The landmark sit-com introduced us to Julia Baker, an African American widow and her young son, Corey.  Living in Los Angeles, Julia worked as a nurse beside the grouchy, but still lovable, Dr. Morton Chegley.  Played magnificently by Diahann Carroll, Julia challenged stereotypes and changed perceptions.  Warm, spirited and determined, Julia became a star who is fondly remembered even today!  Revisit the memories with this wonderful reproduction of the original Julia doll from 1969!  This beautiful doll, based on the TV character played by Diahann Carroll, is housed in a striking package inspired by the original design.
One of the side panels of the 50th-anniversary doll's box describes the doll has "Bendable legs and Twist 'n' Turn waist, Diahann Carroll as Julia.  New TV Star!" An image of the doll dressed fashionably is below the text.


Born Carol Diahann Johnson on July 17, 1935, Ms. Carroll died today, October 4, 2019, at the age of 84.  She exuded grace, intelligence, and beauty and will be sorely missed.  I enjoyed her in Julia and in every other role she portrayed, but Claudine remains my all-time favorite Diahann Carroll role (and the soundtrack is great).  Her role in The Five Heart Beats was a small one, but I loved her in that, too.

Related Links
Julia Paper Dolls
Identifying Julia Dolls and Clothes
Julia Dolls
Claudine (full movie)


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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for following, commenting, and sharing using the share button below.

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Keisha #5 (For Me)

Keisha by the Keisha Doll Company, 1985 is an all-vinyl 24-inch doll.

I am not quite sure what fuels my love for the Keisha line of dolls, but I clearly remain enthused about them.  Perhaps the fact that they were created by an African American woman (a decade before I began collecting dolls); and the fact that had I known about the dolls, I would have certainly purchased at least one for my daughter are the reasons for my Keisha enthusiasm.

My first Keisha was purchased during the 1990s (Cleopatra A).  I had said I would stop buying them after the third one was purchased (Ashanti I), but along came the fourth (Ashanti II).  Then I saw this one dressed in everyday clothing on eBay and couldn't resist making the seller an offer that she did not refuse.

This is my first Keisha that is not in costume to represent a historic African American female.  That is probably another reason I wanted her. My other four represent two versions of Cleopatra and two versions of Ashanti.

So this doll is just Keisha, made by the Keisha Doll Co. by a former school teacher, Helen J. Steward.  Ms. Steward often named the dolls that did not represent historic figures after students; and because Keisha was a common name at the time, she decided to use that as the name for the company and for the original doll.  It is possible that she gave this one a name other than Keisha, too.

Keisha arrived, as shown above, wearing socks with her clothes but no shoes.  Otherwise,
she appears to be dressed originally.
The head is marked Keisha II/©H.J.S 1983/008695.  Like the others, she is all-vinyl and stands 24 inches tall.  She has mounds of closely rooted black curly hair and brown sleep eyes.  She arrived wearing a long-sleeved red turtleneck top, blue denim pants, and white knit socks.



I removed the socks and added navy blue faux suede sandals.  (I found these "newborn" size sandals in my My Twinn stash of doll shoes.)

Like the others, she now has pierced ears to which I have added gold stud earrings.  I also added two gold hair ornaments to her hair.  I might add more of the same hair ornaments later.  For now, the two will do.

Keisha poses here in a full-view photograph after the hair ornaments and sandals were added.  I think a denim vest, a blue suede vest with fringe, or a pendant necklace would complement her fashion.

More information about the Keisha Doll Company is included in one of my earlier posts about my first two Keisha dolls and can be read here.

Other Related Links:
Sandals for Ashanti Keisha
Cleopatra B Joins Ashanti and Cleopatra A Keisha
Who Mails a Doll in an Envelope (Ashanti II Keisha)

dbg


There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for following, commenting, and sharing using the share button below.

Check out what I am selling here
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Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Two More Composition Doll Repairs


The crazed head of the Topsy doll seated to the right of the doll in the rust-colored romper was recently repaired.   This photo was taken before the repair.
After repairing the 9-inch Topsy, shown above in the rust-colored romper and introducing her to other circa 1930s composition Topsy dolls that are displayed in a doll baby bed, I noticed a couple of other dolls that needed my attention.

A crazed head (lifted composition) was one doll's issue.  Another doll had been poorly repaired by a previous owner.  Crazed areas had not been filled in on the second doll; these and other areas on the doll's hands, body, and legs had been painted a brown color that did not match the original brown paint.  Additionally, this doll was not an authentic Topsy.

I did not take pictures immediately before the repairs of either doll because this post about their repairs was not planned.  I was able to find some vintage before photos of the dolls to share.

The First Doll Patient
These vintage photos illustrate some of the head crazing this doll had prior to its recent repair.
The 9-inch Topsy in the peach gingham dress arrived in the late 1990s to early-2000s with some head crazing and minor crazing on the sides of the face.  The head crazing had progressed as shown in the first photo of this post where the head looked like a case of vitiligo.

The crazed areas were almost crater-like.  These were filled in using several layers of Mod Podge until the areas were even with the original surface of the head.  After the Mod Podge dried completely, I painted the entire head black.  The lightly crazed areas of the face were filled-in and painted with a mixture of acrylic brown paints that match the doll's original complexion.  I repainted the eyes and sealed the dried paint with satin finish liquid varnish that was applied with wedge make-up sponges.  Most of the painting was done with the sponge wedges, too. Paint brushes or toothpicks were used for detailed painting of small areas.  As a final touch, I gave her new ribbons for her hair.

Below are several after photos of this little girl now.


The different angles of her head illustrate the repaired and painted head crazing.

Full-view and fresh look post repair.
The Second Doll Patient

12-1/2-inch fake Topsy wears the same white see-through dress that she arrived wearing over a decade ago.  A crazed area on her chin and other areas throughout her body had been painted over by a previous owner using a lighter color brown than that used for the rest of her face and body.

This doll had been made into a Topsy by a former owner who took the liberty to shoddily drill three large holes into the doll's head and add a few pieces of embroidery thread into each.  While performing the minor fill-ins of this doll's crazed areas (mostly on the head) and repainting the entire doll an even color, I decided to remove the embroidery thread from the head and fill in the holes with air-dry clay to restore her to her original molded/painted hairstyle.  After painting, satin finish liquid varnish sealed the paint.  Photos of how she looks now are shared below.

There are no more holes in this baby's head and those tacky ponytails are gone, gone gone!

The chin area is now a more even color.
I used a men's crew sock to make a pair of undies for the baby to prevent most of her body from showing through the dress.

New undies made from a crew sock

I think she looks much better without the Topsy braids and her now even coloring also adds to her appeal.

"I'm all better now."

Back to Bed
The baby in the peach gingham dress readily went back to her place in the baby bed.
The second doll reluctantly went back.  She chose to stand instead of sit as she was doing before (facing in the opposite direction) in the first photo of this post.  I will have to watch her closely because I think she still "wants out."

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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for following, commenting, and sharing using the share button below.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
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