Thursday, July 29, 2021

Black Doll History: Berry and Ross Doll Company

1918-1922 Berry & Ross, Inc. doll ad


I recently saw a Facebook post made by Black-Then about Berry & Ross, Inc., an early 1900s black-owned doll company. I traced the source of the Facebook post to an article by Harlem World Magazine wherein Berry & Ross, Inc. is described as "a black-owned doll company founded by Harlem residents, Evelyn Berry and Victoria Ross, located at 36 – 38 West 135th Street, in Harlem, New York. The company was founded in 1918 [and remained in business] until around 1929. These two women were the first African American female large-scale manufacturers of black composition dolls. The dolls appealed to both black and white children and were sold in large department stores in New York City, Boston, Philadelphia, and a few other cities."

Women or girls working in a black doll factory in Harlem, 1929

I searched for additional information on Berry & Ross, Inc., and found the My Auction Finds post, "My Incidental Doll Collection," by Sherry Howard. Howard wrote, "In a 1919 ad in Crisis, the magazine of the NAACP, [Berry & Ross] noted that their 'Berry’s Famous Brown Skin Dolls' were 'designed and made by Colored Girls In A Factory Owned and Controlled By Colored People.' The dolls were sold in large department stores for 29 cents to $3.50 (for a 16-inch Doris with 'long flowing curls'). The company also sold dolls in Africa."

Howard's post continues, "'These are not the old-time, black face, red lip aunt Jemima colored dolls but dolls well made and truly representative of the race in hair and features,' stated a Berry & Ross ad in [The] Crisis in 1917."

This happy child holds a doll attributed to Berry & Ross

The doll held by the child in the photo above that is attributed to Berry & Ross appears to be made of composition.

I am fascinated to learn more about Evelyn Berry and Virginia Ross's initiative to manufacture Black dolls that were well received by everyone in the early 1900s. That major department stores in the US sold the dolls and that they were sold in Africa, is even more fascinating Black-doll history.

Sources:

"Berry and Ross, Inc., Black-Owned Doll Company by African-American Women." Black-Then,

"Colored Dolls" advertisement. New York Public Library Digital Collections.

"Berry & Ross Doll Company In Harlem, NY 1918 – 1929." Harlem World Magazine. December 14,

Howard, Sherry. "My Incidental Doll Collection." My Auction Finds. October 9, 2019,


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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
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Tuesday, July 27, 2021

1971 Malibu Barbie, Christie, and PJ

Close-up photos of Mattel's reproduction of 1971 Sunset Malibu Barbie, Christie, and PJ 


I purchased the 1971 Malibu Barbie Giftset because an original NRFB Sunset Malibu Christie (in the red bathing suit) had been on my wish list for quite some time. I already own two original Malibu Christies from 1976 (in the yellow bathing suit). I used to own three, but one was sold several years ago. The secondary-market price of the original Sunset Malibu Christie (originally released in 1973) far exceeds what I desire to pay. I cannot express how thrilled I was upon discovering Mattel's plan to release the reproduction set. 

1968 Barbie Mod Friends Giftset is a reproduction of the original 1968 Christie, Barbie, and Stacey

For a fleeting moment, I thought I would wait to see if the 1971 reproduction set would be discounted like the 1968 Barbie Mod Friends set was in 2018 (see the above picture). By December 2018, it had been reduced from $80 to $40. My reasoning that the 1971 reproduction set would be a better seller than the mod set, influenced me to purchase it immediately. 

Full-view of the 1971 Malibu Barbie Giftset

Barbie wears a light blue bathing suit. Christie's bathing suit, as mentioned, is red. PJ's bathing suit is pink. Each doll has a vintage personalized wrist tag. The set includes three beach towels which are neatly folded and placed behind the dolls. The towels are yellow, white, and light green. On top of their heads, each doll has a pair of pink clear lens sunglasses. Also included is a doll stand for each doll and one certificate of authenticity.

Back of the box illustrations and text


The back of the box reads: 

Surf's up with "The Sun Set!" Malibu Barbie and her beach-loving friends made a big splash with their debut in 1971. With their sun-kissed, tan skin and cool beach vibe, they're the groovy girls everyone wants to know. Each classic reproduction doll is dressed in a replica of her original swimsuit and comes with a towel, sunglasses, and vintage wrist tag. Fifty years later, Barbie the original California girl, and her friends are still making waves. 

Scroll down (at the link) to see additional photos of the 1968 Mod Set and my review of it here.

dbg


There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

Check out what I am selling here
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Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
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Thursday, July 22, 2021

When They Go Low

Two 14-inch 1960s fashion dolls have side-glancing eyes and heavy blue eyeshadow.


The daughter of a doll collector sent photos of two "Barbie clones" and asked if I had any interest. I did, except I don't actively collect 14-inch vintage fashion dolls, which is what I considered these. I do enjoy collecting Black Barbie clones and competitors. After deciding whether I wanted these two or not, based on the photo above and their lovely faces, I made the purchase. The dolls arrived swiftly in a much larger-than-expected box. 

A larger-than-expected shipping box was necessary to accommodate their lacy cotillion-style dresses. 

After opening the box, I realized the dolls had not only been redressed in lacy cotillion-style dresses, but because of the length of the dresses, which is double their height, the dolls would require a display height that exceeds 28 inches!

The plastic lining of the dress is visible in this photo of the white high-heel shoes.


A thick plastic lining is stitched to the dress skirts. A crisscross of lace forms each bodice. Both dolls have matching lace hats. The dolls still wear their original white plastic high-heel shoes. The heel of one shoe is bent, but I can probably straighten it by dipping it into boiled water to soften it before reshaping. The length of the dresses will prevent anyone from seeing the shoes unless the skirts are lifted.

The dolls have quite lovely faces. 

Typical of this type of Hong-Kong-made doll, the head is soft vinyl. The body is hollow plastic.


My initial plan was to redress the dolls. Based on their head mark, SHARING NO. 3001, and the upper back mark, MADE IN HONG KONG, the dolls are possibly circa 1960s Dr. Ben Joins the Nurses Dolls made by the Sharing Doll Company. Their head sculpts are identical to the doll shown here except their hair is styled in a bubble cut. The Sharing nurse is probably a competitor of the 12-inch Ben Casey nurse doll sold through the Sears catalog. Dolls like these were also sold by Sharing Doll Company in baggies under different names, one of which was Miss Mod. (Visit the links at the end of this post to see pictures of a mint-in-package Sharing doll, the Ben Casey nurse, and three Miss Mod Dolls).

After these dolls arrived, I asked the seller if her mother made the dresses and if she used the dolls as boudoir (bed) dolls. The seller shared that her mother purchased them from an estate sale. The owner of the estate had used a pedestal-type display. 

I would prefer their original clothes (nurse uniform or mod fashion) over these lacy dresses. However, during the '60s and '70s, using lace, women would fashion dresses like this for dolls they found nude or just because they wanted to dress them like this. It was a thing to do, so I'm going to preserve "that thing," at least for now, and display them higher up than most of the other dolls.

The lower area in my doll room — the floor space — is already occupied with dolls. All shelves are full. The walls are either covered by free-standing or mounted shelves that are filled with dolls. Some NRFB dolls are and stacked against walls. Doll-related paintings and photos and family photos are on what little wall space remains. I had no place to display these dolls in the usual areas, so I decided to hang them high.

Using two Command brand self-adhesive utility hooks that will accommodate up to 3 pounds, I mounted the hooks to the double doors of a metal file closet. The dolls are connected to the hooks at the back of their velvet ribbon waist sashes.

This is where the two dolls hang.

Here is the big picture.

So when they (the dolls) go low (and cover most of the floor space of a doll room), another display alternative is to hang them high, which is what I've done.

Links

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There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!

Tuesday, July 20, 2021

Bessie by Sebino

This is a photograph of the lower portion of the box for Bessie, an 11-1/2-inch fashion doll by Sebino from 1977/1978.


After seeing a photo of Bessie on Pinterest approximately two years ago, I saved the photo to my phone as a reminder that I needed her in my collection. I eventually (about a month or so ago) saved an eBay search for Bessie. I was notified shortly afterward of a listing for a redressed Bessie. My Bessie needed to be all original with the original box, so I passed on that auction. 

During recent communication with a member of one of my Facebook groups, we chatted about clone Black fashion dolls. I mentioned my desire for Bessie and he shared the link to an auction for, guess what, an NRFB Bessie by Sebino. I couldn't believe it because this doll is extremely difficult to find.

Because of Bessie's rarity, I have installed my doll in DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum where additional photos and details can be found here


dbg


There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!

Thursday, July 15, 2021

Middleton Dolls Sculpted by Reva Schick

Signature Baby's Bibles included with Lee Middleton Original Dolls


Reva Schick is the first artist to have dolls produced under the Lee Middleton Original Dolls brand after Lee Middleton's death on January 30, 1997. On May 27, 2021, the doll community lost the sculpting and artistic talents of Reva Schick.

British Columbia-born Reva Schick is well known for her lifelike baby doll sculpts. She later branched out and began creating doll kits for reborning. Some of the dolls Schick sculpted for Lee Middleton Original Dolls between the years 2001 and 2006 that are or were part of my personal collection are shown below. In keeping with the Lee Middleton Original Dolls tradition, all dolls came with a Baby's Bible and a certificate of authenticity.

2001
Pamper's Kid is a 22-inch vinyl baby with a brown cloth body. A bottle attached to spilled milk was included with the doll. 

2003
Created at the inception of the "reborn" doll craze, Baby Ellie has several "reborn" doll characteristics. Made of a silicone/vinyl mixture to give a more lifelike perception, at 18 inches, she is the size of a premature baby. Her rooted hair appears to have grown from her scalp — a first for a mass-produced doll. She has a weighted head and a pellet-filled cloth body.

***
Treasured Child Darling Angel "Pink Bear" wears her original pink and white bear-print top and bottom and pink hat. She is a thumbsucker. Her construct is more armatured cloth than vinyl. So she requires long-sleeve tops, long dresses, or pants.

Treasured Child has been redressed in this photo. That thumb still "tastes" good to her.


2004
For Love of Country is from a combined collection of 150 dolls that included three boys — a blonde, a brunette, and the African American doll shown here. A doll-size American flag was included with each. For Love of Country is 22 inches tall and, like the others, has a stuffed brown cloth body and vinyl head, arms, and legs. (I always appreciate it when the cloth body matches the vinyl.)

***

Waiting for Santa is from a numbered limited edition of 300. She is 24 inches tall.


2005

Playing Mommy and Little Baby, a two-doll set, are 21 inches and 13 inches, respectively. They wear their original clothes in this 2005 photo. Shortly after arrival, Playing Mommy was redressed in pink overalls and a white blouse as illustrated below. Little Baby continues to wear her pink flannel romper and matching hat.

Close-up of Little Baby and Playing Mommy

Playing Mommy's redressed clothing

Little Baby in her original clothes

***

The dark background of my 2005 photo of Summer Sweetheart obscures her hairstyle, which can be better seen in the stock photo below.

A stock photo of Summer Sweetheart illustrates her full-vinyl arms. The legs are also full vinyl. The body is brown cloth.

2006

Blessings of Hope by Reva Schick for Lee Middleton Original Dolls is the last Lee Middleton doll I purchased. This one has now been re-homed. A portion of the proceeds from the original sales of Blessings of Hope was donated to the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.

Blessings of Hope is 25 inches tall, made of vinyl with a cloth body.

In a close-up of Blessings of Hope's face, the doll's curly rooted hair and faux diamond earrings are illustrated.

Reva added special touches to Blessings of Hope that included a manicure and pedicure.

Blessing of Hope's pedicure

Blessing of Hope's Baby's Bible and information card

Read Reva's biography here. Her online obituary can be read here.

dbg


There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!


Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Found on a Rainy Highway

Circa 1940s mask face doll


This little girl had a rough life for a known short period of time. After she was offered to me, despite her circumstances, I agreed to pay for her travel expense. 

I received the following email from a fellow blogger, Tam of Planet of the Dolls. (The link to her blog is at the end of this post).

Hey Debbie, This is Tam, from Planet of the Dolls. My husband and I 
recently rescued a tub full of dolls from a rainy highway, and there was 
one I thought you might want. You can have her for free, if you want to pay 
the shipping. I rescued all these dolls, but I don't want them myself, so 
I'm giving them away. I just did a post on the 'rescue', so if there is 
anything there you want, let me know. I thought of you for the cute little 
girl in pink and white gingham, but don't feel you have to take her.
Some of the black or dark brown twill fabric used for her face is faded and was probably like that when found. Otherwise, the cloth on the face and body is in perfect condition.


Tam shared pictures with me and I decided to adopt the doll. She had been through so much and my doll-rescuing spirit compelled me to take her in. 

Before her departure from Tam, her romper was washed, which I greatly appreciate. I really did not know what to expect regarding her in-person appearance. However, the only thing I did after she arrived was reattached a loose snap in the back of her romper after first wiping her off with an alcohol wipe. Her description is recorded on my Excel doll inventory spreadsheet for 2021 as follows:

11-inch cloth-over-molded face doll has side-glancing black eyes, black faux fur (or plush) hair adorned with two red ribbons on the top sides, painted circle mouth; wears pink and white gingham romper. The body is made of black cloth. Found with several other dolls on a rainy day on the side of the highway by Tammy Sedam, who offered her to me for the cost of first-class postage.

The faux fur used for the doll's hair is illustrated in this closeup of the back of the head.


The rescued girl is now on display with a few other cloth dolls.


Read Tam's blog post about the discovery of this doll and several others here

I found Tam's next post about a doll show she attended fascinating. There didn't appear to be many Black dolls there and none that I actively collect, but it was wonderful seeing a room full of vintage dolls that all seemed to be very well preserved. 

This little found girl has now been installed in DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum. Read her installation here.

dbg

There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!

Saturday, July 10, 2021

Harperiman - New Black Cloth Doll Business



I received a link to a list of Black Businesses to Support and was asked to share it with the readers of this blog. I didn't think sharing the entire list here was appropriate because this is a "doll blog" and my goal is to keep it about dolls. I perused the list and found one business listing under Toys for a company that makes dolls.

Harperiman launches today, July 10th. This new maker of adorable cloth dolls endeavors "to help reinforce how beautiful our children are by providing them with positive affirmations of themselves through dolls that they can actually identify with." The business is owned and operated by a mother-daughter team committed to making dolls of color that represent the type of dolls they wish they had and feel they needed when growing up.

Visit their website here.



(The complete list of Black Businesses to Support online can be viewed here.)
 
 
dbg


There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!

Thursday, July 8, 2021

Museum Featured



This blog, Black Doll Collecting, has maintained the #2 spot on the Top 70 Doll Blogs and Websites to Follow since the list was created and hosted by Feedspot several years ago. 

A congratulatory email dated, July 5, 2021, from Anu Argawal, the founder of Feedspot, informed me that DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum™ is now among the 70 top doll blogs and websites, too.

Mr. Argawal wrote,

...DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum™ has been selected by our panelist as one of the Top 70 Doll Blogs on the web.

https://blog.feedspot.com/doll_blogs/

I personally give you a high-five and want to thank you for your contribution to this world. This is the most comprehensive list of Top 70 Doll Blogs on the internet and I'm honored to have you as part of this!
I am happy and honored to have both sites listed. Thank you, Mr. Argawal and Feedspot panelists.


dbg


There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!

Tuesday, July 6, 2021

Jason-Wu/Michelle Obama-Inspired Inaugural Gown by Pat Green

Jason-Wu-inspired inaugural gown by Pat Green was made for a 16-inch doll.


I attended one of seamstress, doll artist, and designer, Pat Green's, live Facebook sales where I purchased a dress made for a 16-inch fashion doll. The dress was inspired by the embroidered white silk chiffon one-shoulder inaugural ball gown designed by Jason Wu in 2009 for former First Lady Michelle Obama.

I didn't know which doll would wear the gown, I just knew I wanted it. 

After it arrived, I tried the well-made gown on one of my Wilde Imagination Lizette dolls, but her torso is too broad; the dress would not close in the back. 

Because Pat offered several nude Esme dolls, Tonner's #1 (red dress) Esme was my second choice. The dress did fit Esme, but I wanted to try it on a different Esme to be certain I had selected the right doll.

Ultra Basic Esme from 2009 wears the Wu-inspired dress by Pat Green.


The dress fits Ultra Basic Esme perfectly. Her complexion is a better match for the ivory color of the dress, and her articulated elbows and wrists provide more posing options. 

A pearl necklace is a perfect accent.

I made a string-pearl necklace to complement the gold and pearl Frankin Mint stud earrings Esme was already wearing. 

The ivory pumps are barely visible in this picture.

Esme wears this lovely gown with ivory pumps from a Franklin Mint fashion made for their Jackie Kennedy doll. 

Here is one final pose from the lovely Ultra Basic Esme.

She is the perfect model for this lovely fabric-flower and crystal-embellished dress by Pat Green, the administrator of the Facebook group, Doll Maker's Delight


dbg


There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!

Sunday, July 4, 2021

Happy 4th of July!

Kuki by Annette Himstedt wears a stars-and-stripes-themed dress sewn by Debra R. "America" is spelled out on the bodice.


To those who celebrate, have a safe and enjoyable 4th of July!
dbg


There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!

Thursday, July 1, 2021

Barbie Loves the Ocean - Updated

Barbie Loves the Ocean


I fell for the hype about Barbie Loves (heart symbol) the Ocean because it's part of a doll line made from recycled ocean-bound plastics. What's not to love, right? Nothing. I also do not recall a dark-skinned Barbie in recent years that uses this doll's head sculpt, which I also like because it's different. The head sculpt has the copyright year of 2017. According to blog reader, Naoma S. E., Barbie Loves the Ocean uses the Barbie Fashionista #106 head sculpt.  (Thank you, Naoma!)

The description recorded on my spreadsheet reads as follows:

Dark-skinned Barbie has straight long auburn-streaked black hair, hazel painted eyes, smiling mouth with the appearance of teeth. The doll's plastic parts are made from recycled ocean-bound plastics; clothes are made from recycled plastic, and the packaging is made from recyclable plastics. The dress is a two-piece sleeveless top and skirt made of ocean-scene recycled plastic. The yellow thongs and white sunglasses that have white opaque lenses are also made of recycled plastic.

Photos


Upon arrival from Amazon, the package was in a plastic sleeve, twist-tied at the top.

The plastic sleeve was removed for this photograph with the doll still inside the recyclable package.

The back of the box illustrates the White and Black dolls. With one hand touching the other doll's hand, they form a heart shape.

A checklist of recyclable features and a QR code to scan "for more information on how Barbie loves the ocean" are on the back of the package.

Released from the packaging, Barbie wears her white opaque sunglasses on her head and her yellow faux flip-flops. The sunglasses and flip-flops were attached to the inside of the package. (I used clear bands to keep the flip-flips on Barbie's feet.)

The clothing has a soft texture and feels similar to parachute material. Do you remember the parachute pants trend of the 1980s? My daughter had some.
 
Another close-up of her lovely face illustrates her full lips.

The length of the hair is illustrated here. The jagged ends were trimmed a bit before this photo was taken.

At the ocean

Barbie illustrates how much she loves the ocean in the final photo above. 

This doll was $9.99 at Amazon (but was sold out there at the time of this writing). I ordered from Amazon because I am a Prime member. Walmart (online) had the doll for $7.94, but shipping would have been extra unless I spent $35. Shopping inside a Walmart Super Store is not an option for me yet.

See the other dolls and playsets in this collection here.


dbg



There are countless items to collect and write about. Black dolls chose me.
__________

Thank you for reading. Comments that are not spam are appreciated. Spam comments will not be published, so don't waste your time. To contact me directly regarding dolls or any of my posts, please use the contact form on the right of the home page, which is visible in "web view." A link to web viewing should be visible at the bottom of this page.

Check out what I am selling here
Check out my eBay listings here.
Please follow my sister blog Ebony-Essence of Dolls in Black.
*New*Visit/Follow DeeBeeGee's Virtual Black Doll Museum
Donate here to support this blog. Thank you!