Friday, March 16, 2012

To Wig Cap or To Root?

That was my question.

I am customizing a doll to look like someone. The customization involves changing the hair, clothing, and accessories of an articulated Christie.  I chose this head sculpt because it most resembles the person the doll is fashioned after.

The hair needs to be pixie short and gray. I knew finding a wig in the desired style and color would be a challenge. This is the reason I opted initially to make a wig cap, buy hair, and glue the hair onto the wig cap. The makings of the wig cap are illustrated in the slide show below:







Creating the wig cap was a piece of cake. I have done these in the past for smaller dolls. Curly hair was used for their wigs. Gluing straight hair to the most recently created wig cap proved to be quite a chore. In my frustration, I wound up yanking most of the wiry (Kanekalon braiding) hair off the wig cap and rooting the hair directly onto the doll's shaved head. Surprisingly the rooting tool that I used in the past for reborn dolls worked.




The result, shown above, is my first attempt at rooting hair on a playscale doll. In the future, if I ever do this again, I will exercise more patience, after I buy the proper rooting tools and hair that doesn't fight back.

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After witnessing my struggle to apply hair onto the wig cap and later watching me root hair onto the doll's head, my husband informed me that I was trying to glue too much hair at a time to the wig cap. He proceeded to explain how it "should be" done:  "A few strands at a time.  You're trying to rush it," he said.  I rolled my eyes while I continued to root.  Then I challenged him with the following statement, "Here, [shoving the wig cap in his direction] you do it, since you know how."   The image below is what he was able to accomplish in less than 30 minutes. 



It would look better if the Kanekalon fibers were not so wiry, but I can tame it after he completes his process.  He stopped to allow the "few strands at a time" to dry.  He'll fill in the gaps later.  (Show off!)

Whether I use his wig cap for another doll is questionable.  Maybe I will transform a playscale doll into a grandparent after I tame the hair. 




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14 comments:

  1. Love it! Very nicely done. I am impressed with it all. Both of you did a great job. You could have been a little more appreciative of his help. I'm just saying. LOL! I had on my list a gray haired pastor for the wedding. This may just be the push I need to make it happen.

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  2. Thanks, Vanessa. Challenging him is an effective way of getting him to do things.
    ;-)

    I do appreciate him. But now that you've made me feel guilty, I'll go and thank him for his efforts and urge him to finish what he started. :-)

    By the way, I used black material for the wig cap and later realized the black cloth would probably show through the salt and pepper hair. After the glue dried and formed the wig cap, I sprayed it with silver Jerome Russell Temp'ry Hair Spray before I began gluing hair to the wig cap. This was all before I gave up and decided to root the hair onto the doll's head. I purchased the temporary hair color at a beauty supply store for $2.99.

    I plan on using the spray for one of my male dolls or one that I will purchase later as a stand-in for the long sought after, elusive Happy Family grandfather that I want.

    You might consider using temporary silver hair color for your pastor.

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    1. I didn't realize that 'rolling of the eyes' was an effective method of challenge. Who knew? Thanks for the info about the hair spray. I think I will just take one of my many Steven dolls and some acrylic paint and have at it. Wish me luck.

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    2. Luck.

      He didn't see me roll my eyes. This was the challenge: "Then I challenged him with the following statement, 'Here, [shoving the wig cap in his direction] you do it, since you know how.'"

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  3. I know, silly. I was just pulling your leg. I see you tolling you eyes at me.

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  4. Can I guess who's likeness you're customizing this doll into? :) This looks great so far, and I can't wait to see how it turns out. Will you be repainting the face? Your husband is very helpful.

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    1. You are very perceptive, Roxanne. No face painting will take place. With the right hair color and style, face painting is not necessary. I'll share the end result soon.

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  5. Great job! I actually like both versions. Your husband did a great job!

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  6. Thank you, Georgia Girl! I do, too. I'm sure I'll find use for the one my husband designed that I finished yesterday by adding hair to the sides and down the top-front-center. I still have to trim and tame it with some mousse or something, but I am very pleased with the outcome and his technique.

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  7. Great Job... I like it! I always wanted another gray haired AA female doll. Happy Family Grandmother isn't as gray as the grandfather. She has more of a beige than a silver tone.

    I have seen this hair in the stores. It is wiry! I don't remember seeing much more in gray tones. I don't think I would have pressed it either. That would be work! I have a few gray hairs...very few. LOL! I guess that is the nature of gray...wiry! So maybe you are on point.;)

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    1. Thanks, Ms. Leo. The beauty supply store had a silky gray ponytail that I considered and some human gray hair but both were cost prohibitive for the amount of hair I needed ($9.99 and $20-something dollars versus the $1.99 I paid for the Kanekalon). You're right, gray hair is usually wiry in its natural state. I actually used an iron on nylon setting and ironed the first few pieces (covered with a paper towel). It straightened it some, but the texture is still wiry and fly away. I do agree the color works well with the brown complexion.

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