Monday, February 25, 2013

Hallmark's Dr. George Washington Carver



George Washington Carver, Hallmark 1979

Hallmark's George Washington Carver is a 7-1/2-inch tall, all-cloth doll with screen-printed facial features.  He wears a removable laboratory coat.  His shirt, tie, pants, and shoes are screen printed onto his cloth body.

Box contains Tuskegee Institute graphics
Presented inside a building-shaped box, the words, "Tuskegee Institute Founded 1881" are written above the green double-doors.  (Click the above image to enlarge.)

Inside flap of box and Carver doll

  The inside flap reads:

George Washington Carver
(c. 1864-1943)

In 1896 George Washington Carver, a pioneer in soil management and crop rotation, became the director of agricultural research at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, where he discovered that nutrients in southern farmlands, exhausted by the continual planting of cotton, could be restored by cultivating peanuts and sweet potatoes.  By developing literally hundreds of industrial uses for these crops, he made the South an important supplier of new agricultural products and earned a place in the history of agriculture as one of its most respected and inventive figures.  
Back of box

The Tuskegee Institute graphics continue on the back of the box, including images of a plant-filled glass box, as shown above.

From the Famous Americans Series I, 1979, according to Black Dolls An Identification and Value Guide 1820-1991 by Myla Perkins (Collector Books 1993/1995), "This [doll] was probably made for Black History Month." 

Read more and view a brief, yet informative, video about the real, Dr. George Washington Carver here.

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9 comments:

  1. I am glad you agree, Paulette.

    Until now, time had not been available for a Black History post from me. After glancing at Dr. GWC's box on the shelf adjacent to my work desk, I thought it would be good to share him before this 28-day month ends.

    Until viewing the video about him, I did not know he had been an orphan. So I learned something new in the process.

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  2. I am starting to find cloth dolls awesome, especially with such nice details like this.

    The prospect of having a scientist doll is well, cute :D

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    1. Nice post! Debbie, I love that you have so much black history that is a part of your doll collection. Awesome!

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    2. Carmen/GG - I am not a particular fan of cloth dolls, but this one was a must have when purchased back in the 1990s, when if it wasn't nailed down and a black doll, I wanted it. I wanted this one also because it is fashioned after a great contributor to American history.

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  3. Debbie, do you visit schools with some of your dolls as I think it would be a great experience for children to view many of the dolls you share in person.

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    1. Hi Muff,

      I have visited schools, libraries, and the African American Museum with my dolls, but I have yet to share my historical dolls with the community.

      I have only shared my evolution of dolls exhibit, From Mammies to Models; and my Dolls with Books exhibit, which includes dolls that were either manufactured with books or dolls that were manufactured as storybook characters. The latter exhibit was an effort to encourage literacy. I have done neither in several years but need to resume. When I do, I will begin with the historic dolls. Excellent idea!

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  4. This is fabulous! Ironically enough, I have a male friend who ALWAYS talks about George Carver. Just as I was clicking on this post, he was calling me on the phone.

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    1. Hi Vanessa,

      It's a little eerie that your friend called you when you clicked on this post, but I can understand why Dr. GWC interests him. I wonder if he knows about the Hallmark doll.

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Thank you! Your comments are appreciated!